Can You Name 11 PGA Golfers Playing in the Masters with Ties to Georgia?

One of the best weeks of the year is finally here… it’s Masters week! Not only is the coveted and world-renowned PGA tournament held in the beautiful city of Augusta, but these 11 PGA Tour golfers also have deep ties to the Peach State.

DAVIS LOVE III 
davis

CONNECTION:  The Golden Isles golf “revolution” all started with Davis Love III, or “Uncle Davis,” as the younger PGA Tour pros who also live on the island call him. This will be Love’s 20th Masters appearance.

Love lives just a short drive away from Sea Island and Brunswick on a plantation simply known as “Sinclair Farm.

Even a portion of I-95 in Georgia is named after him! In 1998, the part of I-95 that extends from the McIntosh County line to Highway 341 at exit 7A and B was designated the “Davis Love III Highway.” Love also has a restaurant named after him on Sea Island called the Davis Love Grill.

In 2010, Love hosted the inaugural McGladrey Classic (now RSM Classic) on Sea Island’s Seaside Course where he continues to be an instrumental figure to the tournament, He is the 2016 captain of the Ryder Cup, one of the greatest honors that golf can bestow on a player.

HARRIS ENGLISH harris

CONNECTION: English was born in Valdosta and played college golf at the University of Georgia. He now calls Saint Simons home.

ZACH JOHNSON  Photo: Golf Week

CONNECTION: Johnson, the 2007 Masters Tour­nament champion lives in Saint Simons and trains at the Sea Island Golf Performance Center. Johnson spoke to the Augusta Chronical about living on the island and said, “the beauty of the place is everything else. It’s the people, it’s the mom-and-pop shops, it’s the food.”

CHRIS KIRKPhoto: PGA

CONNECTION:  Kirk was born in Atlanta and played college golf at The University of Georgia. He now resides in Athens and is sponsored by Georgia Jet, a private jet charter company out of Lawrenceville, GA.

KEVIN KISNER 
Photo: Golf Week

CONNECTION: Kisner, the 2015 RSM Classic Champion, played college golf at the University of Georgia. He trains at the Sea Island Golf Performance Center and lives on the island.

MATT KUCHAR Matt Kuchar hits his drive from the fourth tee during the final round of the Tour Championship golf tournament at East Lake Golf Club in Atlanta on Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)

CONNECTION: Kuchar played college golf at Georgia Tech. While in college, he played in the Masters twice as an Amateur. He now lives and trains on the Golden Isles.

LARRY MIZE 

CONNECTION: Mize, the 1987 Masters Champion, was born in Augusta and worked on a Masters Tournament scoreboard on the third hole at Augusta National during his early teen years. He played college golf at Georgia Tech. Mize now resides in Columbus.

PATRICK REED   Photo: PGA

CONNECTION: Reed played college golf at Augusta University. This is will be his third invitation to play in The Masters.

BRANDT SNEDEKER
brandt-snedeker-pga-tour-pebble-beach_t780

CONNECTION: Snedeker resides in Saint Simons and trains at the Sea Island Golf Performance Center.

VAUGHN TAYLOR Photo: PGA

CONNECTION: Taylor was raised in Augusta and attended Hephzibah High in Hephziba, GA. He attended Augusta State University and still resides there.

BUBBA WATSON

CONNECTION: Watson attended the University of Georgia. He is one of the few left-handed golfers on tour and won the Masters Tournament in 2012 and 2014.

 

*Photo Credit for the player profile pictures by GolfWeek


B6RUpoACEAAGPPb.jpg-large2Parker Whidby is the Digital Content Specialist for Explore Georgia. She loves to write & photograph all the amazing things our state has to offer. In her spare time, Parker enjoys painting, going to concerts, trying new restaurants & spending time with family, friends & pups, Doc and Baxley.

 

 

Georgia’s Tastiest Adventure: BBQ

Old Clinton BBQ

TripAdvisor.com rated Georgia the number one state for BBQ in 2014. In 2015, Joe’s BBQ in Blue Ridge captured the honor of Best BBQ in America. Sufficed to say, Georgia’s got some great ‘que.

How to Find the Best BBQ in Georgia
The problem with great BBQ joints however, is they aren’t always the easiest to find. The best ones are usually a little off the main drag. When on a road trip, our family generally consults Yelp to find a place nearby. After consulting the reviews, the final decision on whether to visit usually rests with the sign outside. If it doesn’t have a pig on it, we question the food quality.

The Brews and Q’s Passport to Flavor
There’s always the Best of Lists too. We’ve found tasty establishments, like Joe’s, based on those lists, and then seek them out when we are in the area. Georgia’s Historic Heartland has gone a step further. They’ve created a Brews & Q’s BBQ Trail. What a brilliant idea! The trail features 30 locally owned locations in 14 counties and each restaurant is listed in an easy to use brochure that serves as your passport to flavor. Many of these country kitchens have been featured on various TV shows and have won awards from numerous outlets. Get it stamped at each place and once you’ve visited a third of the sites (or 10 locations), you can mail in the passport to receive a free Brews & Q’s t-shirt. Download a brochure and get started on a delicious tour through Georgia’s heartland.

For more Fall Fun, visit the Field Trips with Sue Fall Guide.

SueSue Rodman is Georgia’s official Smart Travel Explorer and the editor and publisher of the award-winning family travel blog Field Trips with Sue. Click here for more Smart Travel content from Sue.

Click here to order Sue’s book, 100+ Things to Do in Atlanta.

Click here to follow Sue on Facebook.

Click here to follow Sue on Twitter.

Click here to follow Sue on Pinterest.

Click here to follow Sue on Google+

Click here to follow Sue on Instagram.

Georgia Grown: Causey Foods, Inc.

Causey 002What: Causey BBQ Sauce

Where: Vienna,Georgia & Smyrna, Georgia

Who: The Causey Family

John Causey

John Causey

The Story: John Causey had always played around with the grill and enjoyed barbecuing as a hobby. In 1984, John became part of a BBQ cooking team called the Vienna Volunteer Fire Department and began preparation to compete in the Big Pig Jig in Vienna, Georgia. John set out to create his own vinegar based barbecue sauce for this competition and from that, Causey’s Original sauce was born. John served as chief cook of the Vienna Volunteer Fire Department from 1984 – 1995, traveling all over the South competing in barbecue competitions and winning numerous awards. However, it was over a decade later when Causey Foods, Inc. was established. John’s daughter Wynn Bakke was an event planner in Atlanta for 15 years.  When she left her event planning career to have children, Wynn decided to approach her dad about marketing his award winning BBQ sauces.  With his sauce-making skills and Wynn’s business background and the help of Wynn’s mother (Lady Causey) and husband (Pete Bakke), Causey foods was officially created in 2009. Today, the company is located in Smyrna Georgia and the sauce is made in Hoboken, Georgia.

5 product pictureYou can purchase Causey sauces at http://www.causeyfoods.com/ and at 75 retail locations (see locations here).

Tip: Pack a cooler and stop off on I-75 to fill up with world championship BBQ, sides and sauces at the Causey family restaurant, Good to Go. You can drive through and pick up food or walk in and pick up food – they even have picnic tables outside for travelers in need of some BBQ on their long drive! The official address is 925 E. Union Street Vienna, GA  31092. They’re open Thursday – Saturday from 11am – 2pm & 4pm – 8pm. Call 229-268-8646 for more information.

 

DSCN5149Lauren Cleland is the voice of Explore Georgia on social media. She loves ice cold sweet tea, anything peach flavored, channeling Scarlett O’Hara in her daily life and sharing the wonders of her beloved Georgia with all of you!

Fan Photo Friday

Submit your Georgia photos for the chance to be featured:

Japanese Garden at Gibbs Gardens in Ball Ground, Georgia. Photo by Rick Cannon. Submitted via Facebook.

Japanese Garden at Gibbs Gardens in Ball Ground, Georgia. Photo by Rick Cannon. Submitted via Facebook.

Stone Mountain. Photo by @allaboutdp. Submitted via Instagram.

Stone Mountain. Photo by @allaboutdp. Submitted via Instagram.

Lake Blackshear in Cordele, Georgia. Photo by Randell Meeks. Submitted via Flickr.

Lake Blackshear in Cordele, Georgia. Photo by Randell Meeks. Submitted via Flickr.

 

 

April’s Antebellum Trail Pilgrimage is a Walk Through Time

Ezell Tatum House in Eatonton, Georgia

Ezell-Tatum House in Eatonton, Georgia

Middle Georgia’s 100-mile Antebellum Trail of seven communities offers an abundant look into 19th century life and earlier. Visitors can travel the trail year-round, but many choose April 18 – 21 for the annual Pilgrimage. $25 covers entrance to everything during these four days, with passes available at each community’s welcome center. (Find welcome center addresses at www.atpilgrimage.com). Macon and Athens bookend the Antebellum Trail with abundance and distinctive opportunities fill the communities in between.

The years leading to 1860 are the focus of the trail. I entered the back edge of the Civil War, not battlefield center, with connections to Revolutionary War veterans and families, too.

IMG_4191

Uncle Remus Museum in Eatonton

Eatonton is the 1848 birthplace of Joel Chandler Harris, and the Uncle Remus Museum is 50 years old. Go to the source. You know these tales. Old and new at the same time is the Old School History Museum. Sleep in Watkinsville because the Ashford Manor wraps visitors in history and hospitality.  Choose the 1840s cottage for an antebellum night or the main house, an 1893 Queen Anne. “Artland,” Watkinsville is called, and art is abundant in the 1827 Haygood House, home and gallery of Jerry and Kathy Chappelle. Frontier years enticed me, especially Eagle Tavern built in 1801 on land given to a Revolutionary War veteran.

The 1811 Heritage Hall in Madison provides family stories, exquisite furnishings and lifestyle insight in a two-story Greek Revival home with docent-led tours.The Madison-Morgan Cultural Center stretches antebellum, built in 1895, but enjoy the architecture, theater, Arts and Crafts-style furniture gallery, and history museum anyway.

IMG_4100

Old Governor’s Mansion in Milledgeville

Milledgeville was home to Georgia’s governors from 1839 – 1868, and their house is grandly interpreted as the Old Governor’s Mansion. Those governors received salaries but not entertainment budgets, so note the difference as you follow the Antebellum Trail. Macon’s Hay House of the same era was private, and it’s lavish. In Milledgeville’s Old Capital Museum, an 1807 Gothic building, peer into tableaux of eight antebellum women, researched from diaries and written records, most with a book you and I could read, too. Then go upstairs to imagine the mood where Georgia’s four-day secession convention was held in 1861.

These are just some of musings possible on the Antebellum Trail Pilgrimage. Click here for information on how to attend the 2013 pilgrimage.

Christine 12. 2007 4Christine Tibbetts claimed Georgia as her home state in 1972.  She covers Georgia destinations, and the world, always offering prompts for exceptional experiences and opportunities to muse. Tibbetts earned a Bachelor of Journalism from the prestigious School of Journalism at the University of Missouri and is the recipient of numerous gold, silver and merit awards from North American Travel Journalists Association writing competitions. Follow her at www.TibbettsTravel.com