Minor League Baseball in Georgia with Kids

Minor League Baseball in Georgia with KidsOur family recently went on vacation in Augusta, and while we were there, we attended an Augusta GreenJackets game. It was my first minor league game and a first-ever baseball game for the boys. It was fabulous! Here are five reasons why a minor league baseball game is must-do experience with kids.

1. Close to the action. Georgia’s minor league stadiums offer close-to-the-action seating. When kids can see the players well and actually feel the power of the ball meeting the bat, they are hooked. If you ask me, this is the best reason to start them at a minor league game.

2. Affordability. Tickets to minor league games are extremely affordable, and in many places like Augusta, parking is also free. If you join the Kids’ Club (see below) there are often opportunities for kids to attend for free.

3. Kids Club. Kids Clubs vary in cost from free in Augusta to $30, and their benefits vary. The Sand Gnats Kids Club includes an autograph session with the players, The Rome Braves offer includes box-level tickets. Each team’s program is vastly different, so be sure to look at each one.

Augusta GreenJackets

4. Special Events. My boys loved meeting Auggie, the GreenJackets’ mascot. He was very accessible and easy to get a photo with. Besides mascot days, other special events around the state include Splash day, Fireworks, Boy and Girl Scout Days, Family Nights, Kids Eat Free nights and more. Check Explore Georgia’s blog post on 2015 Summer Baseball Promotions and each team’s programming for details.

5. Play Areas. If your little one gets ants in his pants then you can always head to the play area. We enjoyed watching the last inning of the GreenJackets game as the boys played on the playground. Other fields include inflatables, and other play areas. If you think the kids need a little more freedom than a stadium seat offers, several places like Gwinnett and Rome offer berms for picnic-style seating.

So, where are the minor league fields?? There are four in Georgia: Augusta, Rome, Lawrenceville and Savannah. You can read more about our Augusta experience at 365AtlantaFamily.

 

LesliLesli is the Georgia’s official Family Explorer and the owner of 365AtlantaFamily, which offers a daily dose of inspiration for metro-area families. Click here for more Family content from Lesli.

Fantastic Fort Mountain

Fort Mountain ViewA scenic drive through Georgia’s Historic High Country leads us to a little slice of heaven on Fort Mountain. This state park, hidden in the hills of Chatsworth, is quickly becoming one of my favorite getaways. In addition to the incredible views from overlooks, Fort Mountain State Park boasts one of the most challenging Muddy Spokes mountain biking trails and the 8-mile Gahuti Trail connecting secluded backcountry campsites.CandyCook_ftMtnGahudiTrail

The hiking trails of Fort Mountain range from easy to strenuous. For really amazing views, take a stroll down the easy, paved Cool Springs Trail or hike to an overlook deck on a combination of the West Overlook-Stone Tower Trails. More experienced hikers will appreciate backpacking on the more difficult Gahuti Trail. Gahuti is a beautiful, yet strenuous hike often used by hikers preparing for the Appalachian Trail.

Mountain bikers of all ages and experience levels enjoy taking on 27 miles of thrill riding at the park. Multi-use Lake Loop Trail offers an easy warm-up shared with hikers, while the Gold Mine and Cool Springs Loops cater to more advanced riders looking for a fun roller coaster ride through the forest. Finally, one of the last Muddy Spokes trails a mountain biker completes, the East/West Loop offers a wild and rocky ride for the experts. CandyCook_FtMountainSwim

A Fort Mountain escape isn’t complete without a refreshing dip in the cool mountain lake, a round of mini golf, and perfecting s’mores as the moonlight shines through those magnificent Georgia pines. Pack up the tent and run away to Fort Mountain this weekend!

candycookCandy is Georgia’s official Outdoor Explorer and the author of the blog “Happy Trails Wild Tales.” Click here for more Outdoor content from Candy.

AMP Up Your Summer Adventures

Banish summer boredom with thrilling adventures and new family experiences! Just 20 minutes east of Atlanta, AMP Adventures is celebrating the season with river exploration, free bike rentals, campfire folktales and “s’more!” You can see some highlights below and the full calendar of events here.

Arabia Mt APM

All of these activities are located in the Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area along the Arabia Mountain PATH (AMP). The 33+ mile paved trail is dedicated to hikers and cyclists and is quickly becoming known as Atlanta’s most scenic trail. Remember, while several events are free, many have a limited amount of space so participants should RSVP now to save their spot.

FREE Bike Rentals at Panola Mountain State Park (June 13th and June 14th) and Davidson-Arabia Mountain Nature Preserve (June 20th) For three amazing days you can feel the wind in your hair and the sun on your face as you peddle past gorgeous forests and flower-filled meadows along the Arabia Mountain PATH (AMP). Already have a bike? This is the perfect time to get your bike-less friends to finally take a ride with you!Roasting Marshmallow

Folktales by Firelight (June 27th) Hiking, a campfire, storytelling and s’mores; what a great combination! We have two event start times for a full evening of family fun. We’ll hear folktales from professional storyteller, Jonah McDonald, adventure guide and author of Hiking Atlanta’s Hidden Forests: Intown and Out. This is a rain or shine event, so bring your galoshes if we get a shower!

Georgia River Network: Hidden Gem Paddle (August 22nd) Join the South River Watershed Alliance and Georgia River Network (GRN) for a personal tour of the bends and gentle waters of the South River. This event will attract river enthusiasts from across the state and you can join the tour! The day will include a picnic lunch and presentations along the route, ranging from natural history and water quality testing to river clean-up training! Other floats are planned for June 13 and July 25. Canoe and kayak rentals can be waived for novice paddlers!Georgia River Network

AMP Adventures is presented by the Arabia Mountain Heritage Area Alliance and was made possible in part by a grant from the National Park Foundation through the generous support of Coca-Cola and Subaru.

 

Kimberly EstepWhen not putting her savvy communication skills to use at the Arabia Mountain National Heritage Area, Kimberly Estep can most often be found wandering over hiking trails with her two dogs.  Most of all, Kimberly loves sharing her knowledge of the hidden gems of Georgia with anyone who will listen.

Civil War Wednesday: Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski

Fort Pulaski, Library of Congress HABS GA, 26-SAV.V, 2-50

“From the position the enemy has taken in the Savannah River, it becomes necessary that you look to your defense in that direction.”[1] On February 17, 1862, General Robert E. Lee wrote these words to Colonel Charles Olmstead, the officer responsible for the garrison of 385 soldiers holding Fort Pulaski. For Lee, this occasion did not mark his first visit to Georgia, or to Fort Pulaski. As a young lieutenant in the late 1820s, Lee, after graduating from the United States Military Academy at West Point, took his engineering training to Georgia’s coast.

During the aftermath of the War of 1812, the United States began building a series of coastal fortifications – The Third System. On Cockspur Island in the Savannah River, construction had started on a fortification named in honor of Casimir Pulaski, a native of Poland, who led cavalry troopers during the American Revolution.[2] While Lee influenced the early design of Fort Pulaski, advancements in artillery in the years leading up to the Civil War would prove the death knell of masonry fortifications.

Captain Quincy Gillmore

Captain Quincy Gillmore, Library of Congress LC-DIG-cwpb-06490

Seeking to seal the port of Savannah, and cut the number of blockade-runners making safe passage into the city, the Federals began preparations for taking Fort Pulaski in January 1862. Captain Quincy Gillmore received the task of landing troops and artillery on nearby Tybee Island, and positioning his artillery to launch a bombardment of the fort. Gillmore’s soldiers stepped onto the sandy shores on February 21, but several days passed as the men worked in the marshy areas, busily constructing roads and gun placements. Finally, with all preparations complete, the Federal guns opened fire on the morning of April 10. The artillery – many of the guns rifled – soon found their mark, and the shells started reducing the walls of the fort to rubble. Olmstead realized he held a position no longer tenable; the following day, he surrendered Fort Pulaski.[3]

Colonel Charles Olmstead

Colonel Charles Olmstead, Fort Pulaski National Monument—Georgia, gutenberg.org

Reporting on the mission’s success, Gillmore wrote to department commander, Major General David Hunter. “I have the honor to transmit herewith the terms of capitulation for the surrender to the United States of Fort Pulaski, Ga…the fort hoisted the white flag at a quarter before 2 o’clock this afternoon…a practicable breach in the walls was made in eighteen and a half hours’ firing by daylight.”[4] The fort would remain in Federal possession during the balance of the war, and later served as a prison, which held captured Confederates.

Today, the National Park Service manages the Fort Pulaski National Monument. Please visit http://www.nps.gov/fopu/index.htm for details in planning your next visit to historic Savannah, and Fort Pulaski!

 

[1] U.S. War Department, The War of the Rebellion Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, reprint 1899 ed., Series I, vol. 6 (Harrisburg, PA: National Historical Society, 1971), 389. (Hereafter listed as O.R.)

[2] Casimir Pulaski, National Park Service, http://www.nps.gov/fopu/learn/historyculture/casimir-pulaski.htm (accessed May 28, 2015).

[3] J.E. Kaufmann and H.W. Kaufmann, Fortress America: The Forts That Defended America, 1600 to the Present (Cambridge, MA: Da Capo, 2004), 254–57.

[4] O.R., 139.

 

MikeMichael K. Shaffer is a Civil War historian, author, newspaper columnist, and lecturer. He can be contacted at: www.civilwarhistorian.net.

 

4 Locally-Made Georgia Food Products to Try Today

Georgia Grinders

Photo courtesy of Georgia Grinders

Georgia is known for many things—the world’s largest aquarium, America’s favorite soda, sweet and juicy peaches and a burgeoning film scene, to name a few. Add to the list: artisanal, craft food products made from locally-sourced ingredients sure to please any palette. Take a look at four of our favorites:

Bamboo Juices

Bamboo Juices

1. Bamboo Juices: The juice craze is here to stay, but rather than shell out top dollar for juices made in a far-off factory, why not spend your pennies right here in town and pick up a bottle of delicious cold-pressed juice from Bamboo Juice? Based in Serenbe, Bamboo’s organic juices—they also make insanely delicious almond milks (go for the mushroom coffee!) and elixir shots—are made from raw, organic produce primarily grown right on Serenbe Farms soil. Can’t get more local than that!

2. Georgia Grinders Nut Butters: Georgia may be the peanut capital of the world, but shockingly, there are very few Georgia-based craft peanut butters. Atlanta resident, Jaime Foster, changed that when she launched her hand-crafted, small batch peanut butter, Georgia Grinders, earlier this year. Foster’s premium peanut butter contains just two ingredients—non-GMO peanuts from South Georgia and sea salt—and is produced in small batches, only when orders come in. The Georgia Grinders brand also includes other nut butters, like NaturAlmond, an all-natural almond butter, cashew butter and forthcoming pecan and sunflower seed butters.

Little Barn Apothecary3. Little Barn Apothecary: Though not technically edible, this Stone Mountain-based plant-based company, run by self-taught herbalists Joshua Morgan and Brad Scoggins, makes luxurious apothecary goods from wild-harvested, certified organic ingredients that are good enough to eat, from bath soaks and body washes to oils, balms, salves and naturally-scented air waters (we’re partial to the the lemongrass-basil spray, peppermint-eucalyptus soak, and avocado and coconut oil lip balm).

Pop Stars

Pop Stars

4. Pop Stars Popsicles: Finally a dessert that tastes as great as it makes you feel—Pop Stars, an Atlanta-based all-natural popsicle brand made with all-natural, often organic ingredients, is sweetened with cane sugar and made creamy with the addition of rice and coconut milk. They’re vegan, gluten-free, dairy-free and insanely flavorful, especially if you opt for delicious flavors like Chocolate Salted Coconut, Peanut Butter & Jelly and Strawberry Milkshake.

 

 

KateKate is Georgia’s official Culinary Explorer and a freelance food and travel writer for more than 100 publications. Click here to read more culinary content from Kate