Just Off the Highway: Serenbe

428540_10150305868559949_1341953892_nJust off I-85, south of Atlanta and Windows Server 2012 Product Key tucked into the serene shade of Chattahoochee Hill County is the incredibly beautiful land that makes up the Serenbe community. Buildings ooze farmhouse charm while maintaining a nationally recognized eco-friendly footprint that makes a trip to the community a must for any visitor to Georgia.

Only 30 minutes from Atlanta, visitors are greeted by fresh air, farm life and a village among the 1,000 acres, including renowned restaurants The Hil and The Farmhouse at Serenbe. Within minutes of your arrival at Serenbe, you’ll understand why the area has been dubbed the “Sonoma for the New South” by the New York Times.

Serenbe isn’t just a few farmhouses, a village and some great restaurants. It’s a community with schools, stores, festivals, a theater and a hotel. Here are a few of my must-visit stops on a trip to Serenbe:

374098_10150728970173329_644448988_n1.) Blue Eyed Daisy Bakeshop (9065 Selborne Lane, Chattahoochee Hills, Georgia)- Led by pastry chef Cindi Pitman, the 2012 winner of the Food Network’s Cupcake Wars, the shop is the smallest Silver LEED-certified building in the United States. Cupcake flavors vary daily, so visit their Facebook page before you go.

2.) The Farmhouse at Serenbe (10950 Hutcheson Ferry Road, Chattahoochee Hills, Georgia)- Atlanta Magazine’s Best New Restaurant in 2007 has become known for its fried chicken lunch, which is served Saturdays and Sundays. The menu changes weekly depending on what is in season on the farm. Be sure to make reservations before you go.

3.) Peachtree Bikes (9119 Selborne Lane, Chattahoochee Hills, Georgia)- Looking to explore Sernebe like a local? Rent a bike from Peachtree Bikes and enjoy a new adventure around town.

251000_10151652364242220_1235212912_n4.) Serenbe Playhouse (9110 Selborne Lane Suite 210, Chattahoochee Hills, Georgia)- With programming to serve a wide variety of age groups, the Serenbe Playhouse currently has The Velveteen Rabbit on stage through July 27 and offers season tickets for as low as $50.

Want more out of your visit? Perfect for weekend getaways and romantic overnight stays, The Inn at Serenbe has several different types of accommodations to choose from, including the main house, guest house, cottages and village suites.

For an escape from the hustle and bustle of reality, escape to the eco oasis that is Serenbe.

eileenEileen Falkenberg-Hull is a digital marketing professional based in Atlanta who first visited Georgia in 1994 and decided that when she graduated from college she would make Georgia her home. Since 2007 that dream has been a reality. She is the founder and executive director of Occupy My Family.

Fan Photo Friday

Submit your Georgia photos for the chance to be featured:

George L. Smiths State Park in Twin City, Georgia. Photo by Eric Albright. Submitted via Facebook.

George L. Smiths State Park in Twin City, Georgia. Photo by Eric Albright. Submitted via Facebook.

Trenton Golf Club. Photo by @chattmom. Submitted via Instagram.

Trenton Golf Club. Photo by @chattmom. Submitted via Instagram.

Atlanta Botanical Garden. Photo by Rob Dunalewicz. Submitted via Flickr.

Atlanta Botanical Garden. Photo by Rob Dunalewicz. Submitted via Flickr.

 

 

10 of Georgia’s Famous Final Resting Places

Tombstones

Famous writers, actors, sports figures, musicians and creators are interred in Georgia’s cemeteries. Here are 10 of our state’s most famous final resting places.

1. Ty Cobb- A professional baseball player that was both loved and hated, Ty Cobb dominated major league baseball in its early years. He died July 17, 1961, at Emory University Hospital after a battle with prostate cancer and is interred in his family’s mausoleum in Royston.

Margaret Mitchell2. Margaret Mitchell - The writer best known for her novel Gone With The Wind was hit by a drunk driver on Peachtree Street in Atlanta the evening of Aug. 11, 1949. She died five days later at Grady Memorial Hospital without ever having regained consciousness. She was buried at Oakland Cemetery in Atlanta where her husband was buried beside her only a few years later.

 

3. Joel Chandler Harris - The author best known as the author of the Uncle Remus died July 3, 1908, from acute nephritis and cirrhosis of the liver. He is interred at Westside Cemetery in Atlanta.

Bobby Jones4. Robert Tyre (Bobby) Jones Jr. – Perhaps the greatest golfer to ever live, Jones was restricted to a wheelchair in his final years after developing syringomyelia. He died Dec. 18, 1971, three days after converting to Catholicism. He is buried in Atlanta’s Oakland Cemetery.

5. Otis Redding – The man who has “The King of the Soul Singers” inscribed on his tomb was killed Dec. 9, 1967, when the plane he was flying in crashed in Lake Monona, Wis. He was entombed on Dec. 19 at his home in Red Oak, 20 miles north of Macon.

6. Duane Allman – In 1971, the man that Rolling Stone would rank as the No. 2 guitarist if all time and the co-founder of The Allman Brothers Band was killed at the age of 24 in a motorcycle accident. Following his death on Oct. 29, Allman was buried at Rose Hill Cemetery in Macon.

7. John Herndon (Johnny) Mercer - Among his other professional singer and songwriter accomplishments, Mercer was a co-founder of Capitol Records. He died on June 25, 1976, in Bel Air, Calif. Mercer was buried in Savannah‘s historic Bonaventure Cemetery.

8. Uga – Since 1992, each of the University of Georgia’s mascots has been interred in a mausoleum near the main entrance to Sanford Stadium upon their death.

Path9. (Mary) Flannery O’Conner – One of the best known Southern writers in history, O’Conner developed lupus at a young age and died at 39 at Baldwin County Hospital. The woman whose book Complete Stories won the 1972 U.S. National Book Award for Fiction is buried in Memorial Hill Cemetery in Milledgeville.

 

10. Juliette Gordon Lowe – The founder of the Girl Scouts of America developed breast cancer in 1923 and died four years later on Jan. 7, 1927. The 66 year old, buried in her Girl Scout uniform, was laid to rest in a plot in Laurel Grove Cemetery in Savannah.

Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Eileen Falkenberg-Hull is a digital marketing professional based in Atlanta who first visited Georgia in 1994 and decided that when she graduated from college she would make Georgia her home. Since 2007 that dream has been a reality. She is the founder and executive director of Occupy My Family.

Fan Photo Friday

Submit your Georgia photos for the chance to be featured:

Downtown Atlanta. Photo by "Photos by Brumac." Submitted via Facebook.

Downtown Atlanta. Photo by “Photos by Brumac.” Submitted via Facebook.

Fort King Block House. Photo by Michael S. Owens. Photo submitted via Flickr.

Fort King Georgia Block House. Photo by Michael S. Owens. Photo submitted via Flickr.

LaGrange, Georgia sunset. Photo by @cgmccall. Submitted via Instagram.

LaGrange, Georgia sunset. Photo by @cgmccall. Submitted via Instagram.

 

 

Baseball in Georgia

digitalcollections.library.gsu.eduThe crack of the bat means it’s officially the season to buy your game tickets and get your peanuts and Cracker Jacks at baseball stadiums across Georgia.

The state’s rich baseball history stretches all the way back to the early 1900s when professional teams like the Albany Babies, Savannah Indians, Atlanta Black Crackers and Macon Peaches attracted crowds.

007 - Atlanta - Fulton County - sports - Atlanta Braves - 04.03.06Some of Major League Baseball’s most productive and best loved (and reviled) players were born in Georgia, including Moises Alou (Atlanta), Bill Buckner (Decatur), Ty Cobb (Narrows), J. D. Drew (Valdosta), Buster Posey (Leesburg) and Jackie Robinson (Cairo). To see a full list of all Major League Baseball players born in Georgia visit baseball-almanac.com.

Current Atlanta Braves players raised in Georgia include Tim Hudson (born in Columbus), Jason Heyward (attended Henry County High School in McDonough) and Brian McCann (born in Athens, graduate of Duluth High School).

Georgia is currently home to six minor and major league professional baseball teams: Atlanta Braves, Augusta GreenJackets, Columbus Catfish, Gwinnett Braves, Rome Braves and Savannah Sand Gnats.

No matter what baseball team you root for in any division or at any level, you’re probably cheering for someone from Georgia. From managers to players, Major League Baseball and its farm system is rich with Georgia history.

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Fun Fact: Ty Cobb, nicknamed “The Georgia Peach,” was one of the first five players elected to the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936. He received just over 98% of the votes.

Eileen Falkenberg-Hull

Eileen Falkenberg-Hull is a digital marketing professional based in Atlanta who first visited Georgia in 1994 and decided that when she graduated from college she would make Georgia her home. Since 2007 that dream has been a reality. She is the founder and executive director of Occupy My Family.