Malts & Vaults of Oakland: Where Beer Meets History

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What do a jousting match, exotic singing birds and the sun god Ra have in common? Why, everyone’s favorite malt beverage, beer, of course! Find out how the sudsy beverage connects these fascinating topics, and delve into Atlanta’s long and vivid history of brewing during Historic Oakland Cemetery’s new guided walking tour, Malts & Vaults of Oakland: Where Beer Meets History, debuting June 6 at 7 p.m. and June 7 at 5 p.m. The tour adds to Oakland’s existing repertoire of 14 specialty tours and the additional Sights, Symbols and Stories tour.

Authors Ron Smith and Mary O. Boyle of “Atlanta Beer: A Heady History of Brewing in the Hub in the South” will be onsite during the tours. Tickets are $10 for adults, $5 for students and seniors 65 and older, and free for Friends of Oakland. Buy tickets here. As with all of Oakland’s guided tours, a ticket grants $5 off any purchase at neighboring restaurant Six Feet Under. With this tour, guests will also be granted $1 off a purchase at the nearby My Friend’s Growler Shop.

2The Historic Oakland Foundation offers several types of tours to entertain, educate, and enlighten the community throughout the year.  The Sights, Symbols and Stories guided overview tour is offered every weekend and special topic tours are offered every weekend mid-March through mid-October. Additionally, guided tours are offered for private groups and schools. Several options are available for self-guided tours.

Reservations are required for Malts & Vaults of Oakland: Where Beer Meets History. Buy tickets here. Stay up-to-date with event details on Twitter and Facebook.

About Oakland│ Spanning 48 acres east of the city, Oakland Cemetery is an arboretum, an outdoor sculpture museum with monuments recognized by the Smithsonian, and an Audubon wildlife sanctuary. Oakland is the final resting place of 70,000 people from all walks of life, including author Margaret Mitchell, 27 Atlanta mayors including Maynard Jackson, 6 former governors, thousands of unmarked graves, and Civil War soldiers. Oakland Cemetery offers critical green space for recreation and serves as a cultural resource for lifelong learners who come to study history, art, architecture, archaeology, horticulture, photography, and more. Founded in 1850 when the City purchased 6 acres of farmland just outside of Atlanta, Oakland Cemetery was created as a Victorian garden cemetery. All lots were sold by the end of the 1800s, but gradually many of the descendants moved away or abandoned their family lots and the cemetery fell into disrepair. In 1976 a group of citizens concerned about the state of the cemetery launched the Historic Oakland Foundation to assist the City of Atlanta in its preservation of this special place. Also in 1976, the cemetery was named to the National Register of Historic Places and soon thereafter declared a Historic Landmark District by the Atlanta Urban Design Commission.  The Foundation partners with the City of Atlanta to preserve, restore, enhance, and share Oakland Cemetery with the public as an important cultural resource and an island of tranquility in the heart of the city.www.OaklandCemetery.com