“Gone with the Wind” 75th Anniversary Celebration

Façade of the Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum; credit: Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum

Façade of the Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum; credit: Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum

Mark the calendar and summon your inner Southern belle for a trip to Marietta, Georgia, just outside of Atlanta, during the first weekend in June for a special 75th anniversary tribute celebration to Gone With the Wind, the movie. Don a hoop skirt during the costume ball, cheer on actors during a live play, mingle with celebrity guests – and grab an autograph or two, and join in an author’s forum all to celebrate the beloved Margaret Mitchell classic. The excitement will simply have you exclaiming, “fiddledee!”

While visiting, take time to explore the state’s first and only designated Gone With the Wind Trail. Through the Trail, fans of the Pulitzer Prize winning novel can discover the history and legacy behind one of the world’s most beloved books while navigating a variety of stops in and around Atlanta. Noted by CNN as one of the top 50 things to experience in America’s 50 states, Georgia’s Gone With the Wind Trail begins at The Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum: Scarlett on the Square, a mainstay in downtown Marietta since April 2003 when it opened in the historic Old Thomas Warehouse Building. With an extensive collection of memorabilia provided by Dr. Chris Sullivan, the museum is sure to delight and intrigue any Gone With the Wind fan, from novice to aficionado. Highlights include the original Bengaline honeymoon gown worn by Vivien Leigh as Scarlett O’Hara in the movie, several of Margaret Mitchell’s personal volumes of the novel, an educational display dedicated to the African American cast members, foreign editions of the novel and more. Be sure to stop by the gift shop to find costumes to fit your favorite Rhett or Scarlett.

Visit www.GWTWMarietta.com for complete event details.

Event listing

June 6-8

Marietta Celebrates the 75th Anniversary of Gone With the Wind

Throughout the weekend, the Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum: Scarlett on the Square will host a variety of events celebrating the 75th anniversary of Gone With the Wind, the movie. Festivities to include dinner and costume ball, author’s forum, live play, documentary debut, celebrity guests, autograph signing and much more.

Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum: Scarlett on the Square, 18 Whitlock Avenue, Marietta, GA 30064

770-794-5576

Civil War Events in Marietta

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With a history dating back to 1834, Marietta, Georgia, a present-day big city with small town charm located  minutes north of Atlanta and just south of the North Georgia Mountains, was the stage on which many significant events during the Civil War unfolded. Marietta was also once a proposed Capital of the Confederacy and is still home to the Marietta National Cemetery. This year marks the sesquicentennial of the fourth year of battle between the North and the South and Marietta commemorates important happenings with year-round special events – many of which are taking place this summer.

Gather the whole family or embark on your own personal historical pursuits and remember this historic occasion with events like the Juneteenth annual celebration, a reenactment of the March from Marietta Square to Kennesaw Mountain, Civil War: The Musical at the Strand Theatre, a re-dedication recognizing the 100th anniversary of dedication of the Illinois monument and more. The Bleeding Gray and Blue Walking Tour, every Saturday in June, joins visitors with noted historian Brad Quinlin as he tours the Historic Marietta Square, highlighting the events and the places that served as hospitals during the Civil War.

cannonHead to Marietta during the last weekend in June when a series of events hosted by the National Park Service will commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain with various activities beginning with an opening ceremony on Thursday, June 26, and concluding on June 29. Each day will consist of different proceedings including cannon demonstrations, guided hikes, and a Civil War fashion show, along with Civil War medical tents, activities for children and various speakers and presentations. Check out the website for a full list of events.  www.BattleofKennesawMountain150.com

Download Marietta’s free Cannonball Trail app (iTunes or Android) and take a self-guided driving tour around Marietta and through Kennesaw Mountain Battlefield where you’re treated to historically-significant sights such as the fields where men fought and died, the cemeteries where those brave men rest eternally, the houses that commanders used as their headquarters and the city where it all took place.

Round out a visit with stops at area attractions, many of which are of historical note. Located on the second floor of the historic Kennesaw House, the Marietta Museum of History tells a rich account of the area. Also nearby, the Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum: Scarlett on the Square was established in April of 2003 and currently houses Dr. Christopher Sullivan’s privately owned collection of GWTW book and movie memorabilia.  Two blocks from the square, the Root House is one of the oldest surviving frame houses in Marietta. The home offers visitors an opportunity to experience how a middle class merchant and his family lived in the 1850s. Climb aboard the Historic Marietta Trolley Company for a one-hour, fully-narrated exploration of the city. Visit Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park where so many important events in the Civil War transpired and then come full-circle with a trip to the modern-day Marietta Square Farmers Market.

For a side of culture, take time to appreciate metropolitan Atlanta’s only museum dedicated to American art, the Marietta /Cobb Museum of Art, housed in Marietta’s first U.S. Post Office, and home to a full schedule of exhibitions and boasting a permanent collection of 19th and 20th century American art, from Warhol to Wyeth. And, don’t miss the Earl Smith Strand Theatre, an Art Deco theatre that served as a movie house on the Marietta Square from 1935-76 where you can catch a performance of “Civil War: The Musical” this summer.

Event listings

June 7

Bleeding Gray & Blue Walking Tours

Join noted historian Brad Quinlin as he tours the Historic Marietta Square. These fascinating tours will highlight events and the places that served as hospitals during the Civil War.  Every Saturday in June.

11:30 a.m.

Tours begin at the Marietta Museum of History, 1 Depot Street, Marietta, GA 30060

770-794-5710

www.MariettaHistory.org

June 8

Spirituals

Dr. Moses performs spirituals at Zion Baptist Church.

4 p.m.

Zion Baptist Church, 165 Lemon Street, Marietta, GA 30060

770-427-8749

www.ZionBaptistChurchMarietta.org

June 13-14

Juneteenth Concert and Celebration

Join the Cobb NAACP for the annual Juneteenth celebration and concert including arts and crafts, food, entertainment, and historical recreation and reading of Emancipation Proclamation. Juneteenth is the oldest national celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.

6-11 p.m., Friday, June 13; 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Saturday, June 14; Gospel Concert 3-6 p.m., Sunday, June 15

Historic Marietta Square

770-425-5757

www.CobbNAACP.org

June 14

Bleeding Gray & Blue Walking Tours

Join noted historian Brad Quinlin as he tours the Historic Marietta Square. These fascinating tours will highlight events and the places that served as hospitals during the Civil War.  Every Saturday in June.

11:30 a.m.

Tours begin at the Marietta Museum of History, 1 Depot Street, Marietta, GA 30060

770-794-5710

www.MariettaHistory.org

Contact: Jan Galt, Jgalt@MariettaGa.gov

June 20-21

The Civil War, A Musical Experience Weekend

Friday and Saturday, June 20-21

Earl Smith Strand Theatre, 117 North Park Square, Marietta, GA 30060

770-293-0080

www.EarlSmithStrand.org 

June 20-22

Battle Re-enactors and Encampments on Marietta Square

Battle re-enactors and encampments will take place in and around the Historic Marietta Square.

All day

Historic Marietta Square

770-429-1115

www.MariettaCivilWar.com

June 21

Bleeding Gray & Blue Walking Tours

Join noted historian Brad Quinlin as he tours the Historic Marietta Square. These fascinating tours will highlight events and the places that served as hospitals during the Civil War.  Every Saturday in June.

11:30 a.m.

Tours begin at the Marietta Museum of History, 1 Depot Street, Marietta, GA 30060

770-794-5710

www.MariettaHistory.org

June 22

Confederate Cemetery Tour by Friends of Brown Park

Living history tours at the Marietta Confederate Cemetery and City Cemetery.

1-4:30 p.m.

Marietta Confederate Cemetery, 395 Powder Springs Street, Marietta, GA 30060

770-794-5606

www.MariettaCivilWar.com

June 26-29

The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain Anniversary Events

The National Park Service commemorates the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain with various events beginning with an opening ceremony on Thursday, June 26, and concluding on June 29. Each day will consist of different events including cannon demonstrations, guided hikes, and a Civil War fashion show, along with Civil War medical tents, activities for children and various speakers and presentations. Check out the website for a full list of events.

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield, 9900 Kennesaw Mountain Drive, Kennesaw, GA 30152. Off-site parking required – check website for updated parking map.

770-427-4686.

www.BattleofKennesawMountain150.com

June 26

Kennesaw Mountain Opening Ceremonies

The opening ceremony is the official start to a weekend filled with events commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

7 p.m.

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield, 900 Kennesaw Mountain Drive, Kennesaw, GA 30152.  Off-site parking will be required – check website for updated parking map.

770-427-4686

www.BattleofKennesawMountain150.com

 

June 27

Claire Lynch Band and Bobby Horton Concert

Claire Lynch is the reigning 2013 International Bluegrass Music Association Female Vocalist of the Year.  Bobby Horton is a multi-instrumentalist, seasoned performer and music historian.

7 p.m.

770-427-4686

www.BattleofKennesawMountain150.com

June 28

Rededication recognizing 100th anniversary of dedication of Illinois monument

The magnificent Illinois Monument, which stands at the crest of Cheatham Hill, was erected by the State of Illinois to honor the 480 men from that state who died on this slope.  The marble monument is thirty-four feet square at the base and the shaft rises twenty-five feet.  Atop the monument is a seven-foot high bronze soldier clutching a rifle and two women in classic Greek garb.

8:30 p.m.

770-427-4686

www.BattleofKennesawMountain150.com

 

June 28

Bleeding Gray & Blue Walking Tours

Join noted historian Brad Quinlin as he tours the Historic Marietta Square. These fascinating tours will highlight events and the places that served as hospitals during the Civil War.  Every Saturday in June.

11:30 a.m.

Tours begin at the Marietta Museum of History, 1 Depot Street, Marietta, GA 30060

770-794-5710

www.MariettaHistory.org

           

June 29

Kennesaw Mountain Closing Ceremonies

The closing ceremony is the official end to a weekend filled with events commemorating the 150th anniversary of the Civil War.

5 p.m.

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield, 900 Kennesaw Mountain Drive, Kennesaw, GA 30152.  Off-site parking will be required – check website for updated parking map.

770-427-4686

www.BattleofKennesawMountain150.com

 

If you go

Bring the family and experience these local Civil War attractions open year-round.

Marietta National Cemetery

The Marietta National Cemetery is the site of over 10,000 Union graves. Henry Green Cole donated the land as a joint Confederate & Union cemetery, hoping to heal ill feelings between the north and south. However, Marietta officials did not want Confederate dead buried near Yankee dead, so they formed a separate Confederate Cemetery.

Marietta Confederate Cemetery & Brown Park

The Marietta Confederate Cemetery is the final resting place for 3,000 Confederate soldiers from nearby hospitals and military operations including the Battle of Kolb’s Farm and The Battle of Kennesaw Mountain.

Kennesaw House & the Marietta Museum of History

Located on the second floor of the historic Kennesaw House, the Marietta Museum of History tells a rich account of the area. It houses the city’s extensive historical collections of photographs, artifacts and documentary information of Marietta in particular, and North Georgia in general.

Gone With the Wind Museum

The Marietta Gone With the Wind Museum: Scarlett on the Square was established in April of 2003 and currently houses Dr. Christopher Sullivan’s privately owned collection of GWTW book and movie memorabilia.

The Root House Museum

Two blocks from the square, the Root House is one of the oldest surviving frame houses in Marietta. The home offers visitors an opportunity to experience how a middle class merchant and his family lived in the 1850s.

The Historic Marietta Trolley Co.

A one-hour, fully-narrated exploration of our historic city. Experience Marietta’s rich heritage, from the vibrant Downtown Square, past grand Antebellum homes, to the battlefields at Kennesaw Mountain.           

Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

On June 27, 1864, Kennesaw Mountain is the site of a major battle between the North and South. General Sherman’s troops battled those of Confederate General Johnston in one of many clashes that led to the fall of Atlanta. The park now encompasses more than 2,800 acres and features a visitor’s center, gift shop, museum and 16 miles of hiking trails.

Marietta Square Farmers Market

The Marietta Square Farmers Market is located on the Historic Marietta Square.  Hours are 9 a.m. to 12 noon every Saturday and 12 noon to 3 p.m. every Sunday, April through November, rain or shine. 60 plus vendors on Saturday and 30 plus vendors on Sunday will feature Georgia grown, made or produced vegetables, cheese, bread, eggs, fresh flowers, local honey, baked goods and milk every weekend.

Marietta / Cobb Museum of Art

The Marietta/Cobb Museum of Art is metropolitan Atlanta’s only museum dedicated to American art. Housed in Marietta’s first U.S. Post Office, the museum hosts a full schedule of exhibitions and boasts a permanent collection of 19th and 20th century American art, from Warhol to Wyeth. Besides their exhibitions the museum offers lectures, workshops, classes, and art festivals. Other social and cultural opportunities are also offered.

           

Earl Smith Strand Theatre

This Art Deco theatre served as a movie house on the Marietta Square from 1935-76. Recently restored and returned to its original glory, it now hosts classic films, concerts and stage productions.

 Expand your experience with the Bleeding Gray and Blue walking tours every Saturday in June with historian Brad Quinlin.

Civil War Wednesday: “Grant’s Strategy”

Lieutenant General U.S. Grant, Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-DIG-pga-01054

Lieutenant General U.S. Grant, Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-DIG-pga-01054

U.S. Congress approved restoration of the rank of lieutenant general, and President Abraham Lincoln quickly sent for his top commander in the west – Major General Ulysses .S. Grant. The officer soon arrived in Washington City, and after meeting with the president, and receiving the rank of lieutenant general – the first to hold this permanent grade since George Washington – Grant made plans to travel to Nashville for a consultation with Major General William T. Sherman. The two officers spent a few days discussing military strategy for the upcoming campaign season; 1864 also served as a reelection year for Lincoln, and the president needed success on the battlefield to sustain, and perhaps renew enthusiasm in the North for the war effort. Military victories might transfer to the ballot box, producing votes, which Lincoln desperately needed! His chances of winning another four years in the White House seemed virtually impossible, as he readily admitted. Grant and Sherman clearly understood the nature of things, politically and militarily, as they poured over maps in Nashville, the fog of war replicated in their quarters as both men continuously smoked cigars.

Grant needed to return east in order to converse with Major General George Meade and other subordinates regarding his military intentions. With maps, Sherman, and an ample supply of stogies in tow, Grant boarded a train for Cincinnati. During their session at the Burnet House in the “City of Seven Hills,” Grant and Sherman finalized what military strategists would later term a ‘Concentration in Time’ strategy. Grant articulated his plan, one, which called for a simultaneous movement of multiple armies against various Confederate forces, in an April 4 letter to Sherman. “It is my design, if the enemy keep quiet and allow me to take the initiative in the spring campaign, to work all parts of the army together and somewhat towards the centre.”[1]

Major General William T. Sherman, Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-DIG-cwpb-07136

Major General William T. Sherman, Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-DIG-cwpb-07136

The future impact upon Georgia began to form, as Grant summarized his plan of action, noting, “Sherman was to move from Chattanooga, Johnston’s army and Atlanta being his objective…[George] Crook the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad to be his objective…[Franz] Sigel was to advance up the [Shenandoah] valley, covering the North from an invasion through that channel…[Benjamin] Butler was to advance by the James River, having Richmond and Petersburg as his objective.”[2] Sherman acknowledged receipt of Grant’s private and confidential letter, and soon began making needed preparations to execute his portion of the plan, specifically,“…to move against Johnston’s army, to break it up and to get into the interior of the enemy’s country as far as you can, inflicting all the damage you can against their war resources.” On the battlefield, March may have exited as a lamb, but soon, the lions from the North would roar into Georgia.



[1] U.S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant (Old Saybrook, CT: Koenecky&Koenecky, 1992), 412.

[2] Ibid., 412-14.

shafferMichael K. Shaffer is the Assistant Director and Lecturer for Kennesaw State University’s Civil War Center , a Civil War historian, newspaper columnist, and author of ‘Washington County, Virginia in the Civil War.’ He is a member of the Society of Civil War Historians, Historians of the Civil War Western Theater, Georgia Association of Historians, and the Civil War Round Table of Atlanta. Michael also serves on the boards of the Civil War Round Table of Cobb County and the River Line Historic Area, andas a Civil War consultant for the Friends of Camp McDonald.

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5 Things You Must See at the Atlanta History Center

As chosen by Sheffield Hale, President and CEO of the Atlanta History Center.

  1. PrivyTwo-seat Privy at Smith Family FarmThe Atlanta History Center searched for years to find a true, 19th-century outhouse to add to the collection of period buildings that form the distinctive Smith Family Farm, the site of some of the History Center’s most successful craft and gardening programs for kids and families. Since no one was willing to part with their own historic outhouse, the History Center built a new one using specifications from an actual antebellum privy. Though a reconstruction, nothing shows the true impact of the lifestyle differences between Then and Now like the “necessary.”  Our two-seat privy always reminds me of the seven-seat privy at Roseland Plantation in Alabama.
  1. Daguerreotype of Richard Peters’ House on Mitchell Street, ca.1850: The daguerreotype was the first successful form of photography and the image of Richard Peter’s house is the oldest surviving photograph ever taken of Atlanta. In 1861, the property was appraised by the city for $10,000. “A year before my marriage,” Richard Peters wrote, “I purchased from Samuel G. Jones his house and two-acre lot at the corner of Mitchell and Forsyth streets for the sum of $1,400.  There we resided and there all my children were born.” I also have a crackpot idea that I’ve been peddling for the last 17 years. In essence: I claim to know who Rhett Butler was. Or at least who he was based on… Richard Peters.  You can read more on my theory HERE.
  1. swan_tablesPair of Swan Console Tables at Swan House“Chosen with impeccable taste,” is how Swan House architect Philip T. Shutze described the Inman’s furnishing of his masterpiece. The most important objects are the pair of eighteenth-century swan console tables attributed to the English architect, Thomas Johnson. Purchased by the Inmans in Bath, England, in 1924, they may have inspired the swan motif that appears throughout the house. Shutze repeated the delicately curving cattails found in the base of the table in his design for the carved cornices above each window. The swan tables and more of Swan House play a part in the upcoming film, Hunger Games: Catching Fire. On November 22nd, the Atlanta History Center unveiled the Capitol Tours. The experience includes a guided tour through Swan House showcasing the rooms in the film and exclusive access to a behind-the-scenes exhibition. For information visit http://www.atlantahistorycenter.com/swan-house-capitol-tours.
  1. Dave Drake Jars: In an area of South Carolina known for its exceptional clay, a slave named Dave created huge pottery pieces that he often inscribed with his name and a short verse of poetry. Dave’s simple act of literacy was illegal at a time when it was forbidden for the enslaved to read and write. Yet he countered the slavery system not by writing words of protest, but by daring to write at all. No other slave artist is known to have put his name to his work. Following emancipation, he took the last name of one of his owners, Reuben Drake, and continued to create his art until his death in the mid-1870s. Many of Dave’s astounding jars are found in America’s finest museums and two of his largest are at the Atlanta History Center in our exhibit, Southern Traditions: Folk Arts in a Changing South.
  1. CSA_flagConfederate States National Flag, 1864: Remember the famous scene in the movie Gone With the Wind when the camera pans back from a sea of wounded soldiers to reveal a tattered Confederate flag waving in the foreground?   Well, this is that flag – sort of.  This twenty-by-ten-foot Confederate national flag (not a battle flag, as shown in the movie) was flying over downtown Atlanta when the city was surrendered on September 2, 1864.  Iowa soldiers took the flag home as a souvenir and it eventually ended up in the collection of Beverly M. DuBose Jr., who donated it and 7,500 other Civil War artifacts in the 1980s.  It is the largest artifact in the Atlanta History Center’s collection. The Atlanta History Center is home one of the nation’s most comprehensive Civil War collections, 1,500 artifacts from which are exhibited in Turning Point: The American Civil War, along with photographs, dioramas, videos, and interactive components.

 

hale2Prior to joining the Atlanta History Center in 2012, Sheffield Hale served as Chief Counsel of the American Cancer Society, Inc. and was a Partner practicing corporate law in the firm of Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP. Mr. Hale serves as a Trustee of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, the University of Georgia Foundation, Robert W. Woodruff Library of Atlanta University Center, and Fox Theatre, Inc. He is a Past Chair of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation, the Atlanta History Center, and the State of Georgia’s Judicial Nominating Commission. Mr. Hale received his B.A. in History from the University of Georgia summa cum laude in 1982, and received his J.D. in 1985 from the University of Virginia School Of Law. He is a member of the American Law Institute.

ABOUT THE ATLANTA HISTORY CENTER: 

Founded in 1926, the Atlanta History Center is an all-inclusive, thirty-three-acre destination featuring the Atlanta History Museum, one of the nation’s largest history museums; two historic houses, the 1928 Swan House and the 1860 Smith Family Farm; the Centennial Olympic Games Museum; the Kenan Research Center; the Grand Overlook event space; Chick-Fil-A at the Coca-Cola Café, a museum shop, and 22 acres of Historic Gardens with paths and the kid-friendly Connor Brown Discovery Trail.

In addition, the History Center operates the Margaret Mitchell House located in Midtown Atlanta. For information on Atlanta History Center offerings, hours of operation and admission call 404.814.4000 or visit AtlantaHistoryCenter.com.

Civil War Wednesday: Attacking Beneath the Waves

Conrad Chapman sketch of the H.L. Hunley.

Conrad Chapman sketch of the H.L. Hunley.

The Confederate submarine H.L. Hunley, made possible with the financing of Horace L. Hunley, traveled via train from Mobile, Alabama, to Charleston in the summer of 1863. General P.G.T. Beauregard, in command of the department encompassing Charleston, sought any method practical to alleviate the ever-increasing effectiveness of the Federal blockade. After a couple of failed test runs, and the loss of several lives, Lieutenant George Dixon assembled a collection of seven brave volunteers to resume training. Their hard work finally paid off on February 17, as the Hunley crew approached the USS Housatonic, anchored outside the harbor, and planted her spar torpedo into the ship’s hull. The resultant explosion ripped the Housatonic apart, and in five minutes she sank beneath the waves of the Atlantic. Five sailors onboard the Federal ship died, but the balance of the 155-man crew found safety on the deck of the nearby Canandaigua. Dixon and his men perished during the attack.

While Dixon and crew prepared for their secret mission, two enterprising individuals also worked on a submersible of their own in Savannah. Charles G. Wilkinson and Charles Carroll, both members of the 25th Georgia Infantry, took their craft out for a test run on February 23 with disastrous results. Little knowledge of their design or plans exists. One historian noted, “…nothing more is known of the event or the fate of the boat.”[1] A few newspaper accounts of the activity in Savannah serve as the main resources for what happened to Wilkinson, Carroll, and their submarine.

Horace L. Hunley, courtesy U.S. Naval Institute

Horace L. Hunley, courtesy U.S. Naval Institute

The Savannah Daily Morning News reported, “Lamentable accident. The chain of the crane upon which the instrument [the sub] was suspended gave way, and Dr. Wilkinson, the inventor, lost his life.” The account praised the men who “…were doing nothing for profit, but simply for the cause in which they were engaged.”[2] The Savannah Daily Republican, in their February 25 edition, noted, “…Wilkinson…had been engaged for some time in perfecting a submarine apparatus; finding it defective in some respects, certain changes were made, which added materially to its weight.” Undoubtedly, this extra weight placed a strain on the cable lowering the vessel into the river. The dramatic fall quite possibly damaged the sub; Carroll effected an escape, while Wilkinson continued to work with an apparent faulty air valve.

The craft sank beneath the river’s surface taking Wilkinson to a watery grave. Rumors of the incident circulated throughout the Confederacy; Richmond’s Daily Dispatch carried a March 3 story, which stated, “Dr. C.G. Wilkinson, Lieutenant of the Emmet Rifles, lost his eye last Sunday, at Savannah, by the explosion of a submarine apparatus, inside of which he was at the time, under water.” Wilkinson lost more than an eye, and Beauregard’s hope for easing the ever-increasing effectiveness of the Federal blockade outside Charleston diminished; February 1864 proved unkind to the brave volunteers attacking beneath the waves for the Confederacy.

Rescue workers soon recovered Wilkinson’s body, and he received interment in Savannah’s Laurel Grove Cemetery. For the crew of the Hunley, they would rest at the bottom of the harbor until August 2000, when recovery efforts for the vessel finally brought her to the surface.



[1] Mark K. Ragan, Union and Confederate Submarine Warfare in the Civil War (Cambridge, Massachusetts: Da Capo Press, 2001), 43.

[2] Ibid.

shafferMichael K. Shaffer is the Assistant Director and Lecturer for Kennesaw State University’s Civil War Center , a Civil War historian, newspaper columnist, and author of ‘Washington County, Virginia in the Civil War.’ He is a member of the Society of Civil War Historians, Historians of the Civil War Western Theater, Georgia Association of Historians, and the Civil War Round Table of Atlanta. Michael also serves on the boards of the Civil War Round Table of Cobb County and the River Line Historic Area, Center Combined Logo-page-001and as a Civil War consultant for the Friends of Camp McDonald.