Fan Photo Friday

Submit your Georgia photos for the chance to be featured:

Paradise Garden in Summerville, Georgia. Photo by Jenni Murphy. Submitted via Facebook.

Paradise Garden in Summerville, Georgia. Photo by Jenni Murphy. Submitted via Facebook.

The Cannonball House in Macon, Georgia. Photo by kennyfan63. Submitted via Flickr.

The Cannonball House in Macon, Georgia. Photo by kennyfan63. Submitted via Flickr.

Kayaking Lake Alatoona in northwest Georgia. Photo by @stouton. Submitted via Instagram.

Kayaking Lake Alatoona in northwest Georgia. Photo by @stouton. Submitted via Instagram.

 

 

Free Museums in Georgia

National Infantry Museum in Columbus, Georgia.

National Infantry Museum in Columbus, Georgia.

A collection of free museums in Georgia. List compiled by Long Live Learning. See the original post here.

Marietta Fire Museum, Profession
Anne Frank in the World, Biographical
Atlanta Monetary Museum, Banking & Financial
Georgia Capitol Museum & Tours, Government & History
Museum of History & Holocaust Education, History WWII
David J Sencer Center For Disease Control Museum, Health & Medical
Museum of Aviation, Aviation
Fernbank Science Center, Science
Elberton Granite Museum, Topical
Adairsville Rail Depot Age of Steam Museum, Railroad Transportation
The Columbus Museum,
National Infantry Museum, Military
Robert C Williams Paper Museum, Topical
Antique Funeral Museum, Topical
DeKalb History Museum, Local History
Roswell Fire Museum, Profession
Smyrna History Museum, Local History
Martin Luther King JR Nat’l Historic Site, Biographical & Historical
Heritage Park Veterans Museum, Military
Georgia College Natural History Museum, Natural History
Cotton Museum, Topical
Jekyll Island Museum, Local History
Jimmy Carter Nat’l Historic Site, Biographical
Kingston Women History Museum, Local History
Lowndes County Historical Society Museum, Local History
Museum of Colquitt county, Local History
Thornateeska Heritage Center and Wetherbee Planetarium, Local History & Science
Thunderbolt Museum Society, Local History
Vidalia Onion Museum, Topical
Chik Fil A Headquarters Tour and Museum, Profession/Commercial
Andersonville Nat’l Historic Site & POW Museum, Military
Rome Area History Museum, Local History
Cherokee County Historical Society, Local History
White County Courthouse History Museum, Local History
Macon County Historical Museum, Local History
Oxbow Meadows Environmental Learning Center, Science & Nature

Free on Select Days or under Select Conditions, Links to Admissions Info Provided

  • Tellus Science Museum: Admissions Info, Science
  • Atlanta History Center: Special Offers Bank of America Weekends, General & Local History
  • Booth Western Art Museum: Currently Thurs Free Admissions Info, Art
  • Imagine It! The Children’s Museum of Atlanta: Free Second Tues of Month Target Tues Info, Children/Hands on
  • Center for Puppetry Arts: Free Admission on Thursdays 1-3pm OR Fulton County Residents First Saturdays Info, Arts
  • Atlanta Contemporary Art Center: Free Thursdays Admission Info, Art
  • High Museum of Art: Free Admission for Fulton County Residents Only: 10am – 1pm First Sat of Month Info, Art
  • The Bartow History Center: Free Admission Last Saturday of Month Admission Info, Local History
  • Georgia Children’s Museum: ree First Friday 5:30pm-7pm Macon Residents: free tuesday and second saturday More info
  • Michael C Carlos Museum: Free Admission on Select Dates and Programs Admission Info, General History & Art
  • Albany Museum of Art: Free Admission on Select Dates Admission Info, Art
  • Georgia Southern Museum: Free Admission Last Saturday of Month Admission Info, Science & Nature

candycookCandy Cook is a professional writer & photographer who enjoys adventuring outdoors with her two sons. She draws inspiration from the natural world releasing it through written word and award-winning photography on her blog LongLiveLearning.com, as well as digital & print publications.

Civil War Wednesday: “Grant’s Strategy”

Lieutenant General U.S. Grant, Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-DIG-pga-01054

Lieutenant General U.S. Grant, Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-DIG-pga-01054

U.S. Congress approved restoration of the rank of lieutenant general, and President Abraham Lincoln quickly sent for his top commander in the west – Major General Ulysses .S. Grant. The officer soon arrived in Washington City, and after meeting with the president, and receiving the rank of lieutenant general – the first to hold this permanent grade since George Washington – Grant made plans to travel to Nashville for a consultation with Major General William T. Sherman. The two officers spent a few days discussing military strategy for the upcoming campaign season; 1864 also served as a reelection year for Lincoln, and the president needed success on the battlefield to sustain, and perhaps renew enthusiasm in the North for the war effort. Military victories might transfer to the ballot box, producing votes, which Lincoln desperately needed! His chances of winning another four years in the White House seemed virtually impossible, as he readily admitted. Grant and Sherman clearly understood the nature of things, politically and militarily, as they poured over maps in Nashville, the fog of war replicated in their quarters as both men continuously smoked cigars.

Grant needed to return east in order to converse with Major General George Meade and other subordinates regarding his military intentions. With maps, Sherman, and an ample supply of stogies in tow, Grant boarded a train for Cincinnati. During their session at the Burnet House in the “City of Seven Hills,” Grant and Sherman finalized what military strategists would later term a ‘Concentration in Time’ strategy. Grant articulated his plan, one, which called for a simultaneous movement of multiple armies against various Confederate forces, in an April 4 letter to Sherman. “It is my design, if the enemy keep quiet and allow me to take the initiative in the spring campaign, to work all parts of the army together and somewhat towards the centre.”[1]

Major General William T. Sherman, Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-DIG-cwpb-07136

Major General William T. Sherman, Courtesy Library of Congress, LC-DIG-cwpb-07136

The future impact upon Georgia began to form, as Grant summarized his plan of action, noting, “Sherman was to move from Chattanooga, Johnston’s army and Atlanta being his objective…[George] Crook the Virginia and Tennessee Railroad to be his objective…[Franz] Sigel was to advance up the [Shenandoah] valley, covering the North from an invasion through that channel…[Benjamin] Butler was to advance by the James River, having Richmond and Petersburg as his objective.”[2] Sherman acknowledged receipt of Grant’s private and confidential letter, and soon began making needed preparations to execute his portion of the plan, specifically,“…to move against Johnston’s army, to break it up and to get into the interior of the enemy’s country as far as you can, inflicting all the damage you can against their war resources.” On the battlefield, March may have exited as a lamb, but soon, the lions from the North would roar into Georgia.



[1] U.S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant (Old Saybrook, CT: Koenecky&Koenecky, 1992), 412.

[2] Ibid., 412-14.

shafferMichael K. Shaffer is the Assistant Director and Lecturer for Kennesaw State University’s Civil War Center , a Civil War historian, newspaper columnist, and author of ‘Washington County, Virginia in the Civil War.’ He is a member of the Society of Civil War Historians, Historians of the Civil War Western Theater, Georgia Association of Historians, and the Civil War Round Table of Atlanta. Michael also serves on the boards of the Civil War Round Table of Cobb County and the River Line Historic Area, andas a Civil War consultant for the Friends of Camp McDonald.

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Off-the-course activities during Masters Week

masters

Photo Credit: Masters Tournament

Fabulous food, music and Augusta history are all available for visitors to Augusta during Masters Week, and provide an opportunity to experience Augusta’s southern hospitality. There are a number of off-the-course attractions and activities open to the public.

The Augusta Visitor Center will offer three Historic Trolley Tours during Masters Week. Guests will see historic homes, hear about the bones in the basement of the Old Medical College, see where a president lived as a boy and more. All tours include a 30-minute self-guided tour through the Augusta Museum of History prior to boarding for the Historic Trolley Tour. Tours will take place on Wednesday, April 9 from 2-3:15 p.m.; Thursday, April 10 from 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m.; and Saturday, April 12, from 2-3:15 p.m.

Trolley tours depart from the Augusta Visitor Center, located at 560 Reynolds Street in downtown Augusta, inside the Augusta Museum of History. Tickets are $15. Reservations are required and include admission to the Augusta Museum of History. To make reservations, call the Augusta Visitor Center at 706-724-4067.

Below you’ll find a list of Masters Week events that are sure to keep you busy off-the-course:

Monday, April 7
The Major Rager
Get ready for the inaugural Major Rager, presented by Friends With Benefits. Music fans will experience an unforgettable night with Umphrey’s McGee and Moon Taxi!
Tickets: $37.50 available online or at the gate
Time: 7:00 – 11:30 p.m.
Location: Jessye Norman Amphitheater, Downtown Augusta
For more information or to purchase tickets: TheMajorRager.com.

Tuesday, April 8
Rock Fore! Dough
First Tee benefit concert featuring: Darius Rucker, Randy Houser, Will Hoge and Daniel Johnson
Tickets: $25 in advance or $35 at the gate
Time: Gates open at 4 p.m.
Location: Lady Antebellum Amphitheatre at Evans Towne Center Park, Evans, Georgia
For more information or to purchase tickets: RockForeDough.com.

Wednesday, April 9

Comedy Zone
Enjoy a fun night out of cool brews, hot wings and comedy at Somewhere in Augusta Sports Bar and Grille. Many of the comics performing at Somewhere in Augusta have been seen on The Tonight Show, The Late Show with David Letterman, HBO, Showtime and Comedy Central. Somewhere offers an intimate setting where you can enjoy the funniest entertainers, live and up close, the way stand-up comedy was intended. Reservations may be required as this is a popular show.
Tickets: $8
Time: 8:00 p.m.
Location: Somewhere in Augusta Bar and Grille on Washington Road
For more information: SomewhereInAugusta.com

Friday, April 11
Augusta Canal Moonlight Music Cruise
Tour featuring musical entertainment, the Mike Frost and Lauren Meccia Duo performing jazz standards. Bring your own snacks and drinks aboard.
Tickets: $25, reservations required
Time: 6:30 p.m.
Location: Augusta Canal Discovery Center, Downtown Augusta
For more information or to purchase tickets: 706-823-0440 ext. 4 or AugustaCanal.com

Saturday, April 11
Voices of the Past
The character of a Petersburg Boat Pilot, is based on oral histories provided by Elberton, Georgia resident,  Mr. ‘Buck’ Balchin, about his grandfather, James Henry Balchin. From the mid-nineteenth century until 1900, Balchin crewed and piloted cotton boats from Petersburg to Augusta.

Tickets: $25, reservations required
Three shows at: 11:30 am, 12:30 pm, and 1:30 pm.
Location: Augusta Museum of History, Downtown Augusta
For more information: AugustaMuseum.org

All Week 
Celebrating a Grand Tradition, the Sport of Golf 
Explore the history of golf and its legacy in Augusta. Exhibit includes two galleries, totaling over 2,000 square feet.
Tickets: $4 per person
Hours: Monday – Saturday 10:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.; Sunday 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Location: Augusta Museum of History, Downtown Augusta
For more information: AugustaMuseum.org

For more information about these and other events in Augusta, Georgia, please contact the Augusta Convention and Visitors Bureau at 877.AUGUSTA or find us online at VisitAugusta.com.

We Asked, You Answered: Springtime in Georgia

Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, Georgia.

Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, Georgia.

Springtime in Georgia is full of blooming flowers, festival food and warm weather! We asked our Explore Georgia fans what they loved most about spring in Georgia and here are the top 5 answers!

  1. Flowers: Georgia turns into a floral fairyland during the spring months. Want to know when your favorite flower is going to bloom? Visit our spring blooms blog.
  2. Warm weather: Springtime means front porch sittin’, lake swimming and windows down weather. What could be better?
  3. Macon Cherry Blossom Festival: Festival attendees are treated to an extravagant display of springtime beauty in Macon. More than 300,000 Yoshino cherry trees and dozens of fun and exciting events and attractions await you during this annual springtime festival. This year’s festival dates are March 21-30, 2014. For more information on this year’s festival, visit http://www.cherryblossom.com/.
  4. The Masters: The world’s most prestigious golf tournament takes every April at the Augusta National Golf Club. Although tickets to the event are extremely difficult to come by, practice-round tickets can be secured through a lottery system. Please visit the Masters website for more information on tickets. If you can’t get tickets to this highly sought-after sporting event, Augusta still has great attractions to keep you busy while you aren’t glued to Masters TV coverage. Start by touring the Augusta Canal National Heritage Area for some insight into Augusta’s historical importance to the state of Georgia.
  5. Braves Baseball: It’s one, two, three strikes, you’re out, at the old ballgame! Don’t miss a chance to see the Atlanta Braves run the bases at Turner Field during the 2014 season starting April 8th at Turner Field.

Featured answers:

  • “Well, where do I start. All the beautiful trees, shrubs, and flowers blooming. The warm weather that I love. All the spring festivals around the state. Love all of it! ♡” - Glori Boria Longworth via Facebook
  • “Dogwoods, azaleas and weather warm enough to sit on the porch on a lazy Saturday and just take in all the beauty nature has to offer!” - Gail Human via Facebook
  • “I love all the beautiful colors of the azaleas, daffodils and cherry trees against the stark white of the Bradford pear and Dogwood trees. The buds of the Cherokee Roses and the mountains start turning different shades of green. Spring is my favorite season in Georgia.” - Suzan Counts Farmer via Facebook
  • “I love to see the cherry blossoms trees bloom in Macon, Georgia. It lets me know that spring is definitely here.” - Kelli Hands Pierson via Facebook
  • “Azaleas, warmer weather, & watching the Masters!” - Amy Hagan via Facebook
  • braves

 

 

Click here to see all of our fan responses.