Surprising Suburbs: Montaluce Winery & Estates

 

IMG_3292Take wine tasting to a new level and move right in. That’s the way Montaluce Winery & Estates embraced me on a side trip from Dahlonega.

Treat the classic “Let’s do lunch” the same way; start early and stay late. Or longer. Overnight options here too.

Of course you’d expect the food and the wines to be excellent so here are six tips you might not be thinking about for stay-longer planning.

P1010662A neighborhood

Streets with names like Plaza Pomino and Via Montaluce, evocative of Tuscany whether you’ve been there, or just dream of a trip. Wind through woodsy and wide-open byways, meadows too as you seek the restaurant and tasting room.

Then take a walk afterwards. Stroll awhile.

Expansive views

The glass-walled dining room and the open-air porch give sweeping views of the vineyard where ten varietals are harvested.  Outdoors, the railing is wide enough to balance your wine glass comfortably and lean on your elbows to gaze.

P1010659Abundant colors

Executive Chef Sean Fritchle is an artist. Plating is the term used often in culinary conversation, referring to pretty ways the food might be arranged. Devise a new word for his artistry, and order the beet root salad no matter what you think about beets.

Rainbow quinoa involves heirloom merlot lettuce, toasted almonds, pumpkin and sunflower seeds, lemon, feta and a dash of sauvignon blanc.

Panna cotta and pound cake might sound like a bland-colored desert, but not here. Bourbon peaches, raspberry pulp and canteloupe sorbet provide this rainbow.

Same for the tomato macaroon with blackberry tomato jam, almond tuile, blackberry sauce and thyme ice cream — sumptuous.

IMG_3300Fresh, natural, real food

The Montaluce Winery & Estates gardens are Certified Naturally Grown (CNG) and that’s important. To me it means they’re committed, practical and honest in a world where organic claims are dubious with so many hoops to jump through.

CNG means real food, no genetically modified substances, no synthetic chemicals and local farming, rooted in community.

Admire rough-cut cedar raised bed gardens in a big field across the way from villas where the neighbors live.  Tuscan kale grows here!

Also, heirloom lettuces and rainbow carrots, micro greens started inside in hydroponic Montaluce gardens, turnips, cucumbers and more.

P1010658Conviviality

Joy and curiosity permeated the luncheon guests throughout my afternoon, greeting one another, asking what another had ordered because it looked so spectacular.

The only electronic devices I saw interrupting meals were my own and my excuse is the professional need to share Montaluce wonders via real-time social media.

Full disclosure suggests I should advise you to employ the same disreputable table manners I used. I ate most of my delicate beet root salad with my fingers, wanting to separate each flavor instead of blending them with a proper forkful.

P1010655Spend some nights

Four privately owned villas can be rented with two-night minimum stays, housekeeper included. Three have three bedrooms and one has five. Prices start at $350 a night, or $500 for the largest.

Enticing names like Villa La Vigna Vista and Villa del Sole, or Villa della Luna and Villa Oliveti. Payments can be made directly through VRBO, Vacation Rentals By Owner, but the Montaluce website will provide the rental link and contact.

Le Vigne Restaurant serves lunch Tuesday – Saturday from 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Sunday brunch  11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Saturday dinner 5:30 – 9:00 p.m.

Wine tastings Tuesday – Saturday 11: a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Sunday Noon – 5:00 p.m.

Photos by Christine Tibbetts

Christine 12. 2007 4Christine Tibbetts claimed Georgia as her home state in 1972.  She covers Georgia destinations, and the world, always offering prompts for exceptional experiences and opportunities to muse. Tibbetts earned a Bachelor of Journalism from the prestigious School of Journalism at the University of Missouri and is the recipient of numerous gold, silver and merit awards from North American Travel Journalists Association writing competitions. Follow her at www.TibbettsTravel.com.

 

Surprising Suburb: Eagle Island

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Sunrise, sunset and moonrise too give new clarity to the earth’s rotations when seen on Eagle Island.

Darien’s the main town and Eagle, a private island to rent, is the suburb

Linger a bit in Darien before heading to sea, or at least into the estuaries of Georgia’s fabled barrier islands.

Shrimp boat masts standing tall, evoking taste bud action anticipating wild Georgia shrimp, one reason for admiring this coastal town. A lively little downtown with eateries, a snazzy wine shop, antiques and an art gallery in a former jail creates another reason.

Experience some Darien before heading to Eagle Island, and some as you return. On your 10-acre private island, comfort and calmness might replace memories of a former life.

Go alone, go with friends, take a lover.  There will be no strangers. Eagle belongs solely to the renter.

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Anticipation of wild Georgia shrimp caught by Darien fishermen abounds from the dock just a few steps from downtown.

Fine if you have your own boat and just as easy if you don’t because Capt. Andy Hill – whose passion for this and seven other private islands nearby – will get you settled in and come back when you need him.

One need I recommend claiming is his low country boil, mother’s shrimp recipe, blue crab catching and cooking and oyster roasts.

Order your groceries via the privateislandsofgeorgia.com website and he’ll have them in the inside kitchen for you.

The outside kitchen is a gathering place too, next to the side yard pond, overlooking the marsh and the maritime forest.

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A screened porch wraps all the way around the main house on this 10-acre private island.

The main house sleeps six in two close-the-door bedrooms and one loft with windows into the maritime forest, a sleeping space open to the great room, kitchen and dining area.

The guesthouse with its pool table, wine chiller, coffee maker and bath has two sets of bunk beds and one double bed.

Difficult to contemplate a private island to yourself? Here’s the context to consider: three to 12 people – $700 a night for weekends, $600 weekdays.

Cozier notion? Two people $575 a night weekends, $475 each weekday. Details and options are spelled out on the website but best of all is telephone talking.

Real, live people come to the phone and chat with prospective visitors to help make a match that really works. Nothing automated. All personal.

Here’s how: 912-222-0801.

Could be tough to fully enjoy every feature on the screened-in 1,500-foot wraparound porch unless you stay a week: abundance of hammocks, gliders, swinging beds, rocking chairs, hot tub, fireplace and endless views.

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Journalist Christine Tibbetts muses about the marshes, leaning on the railing near the Eagle Island dock.  Photo courtesy Leigh Cort Publicity

I stayed only three nights and I embraced early mornings. That’s because sunrise on the dock—itself a room with swings, chairs, tables, railings for leaning—serves up different-every-day colors at dawn.

Kayaks wait on the dock for paddling in these back barrier island waters, and if you take a crowd to Eagle Island, the outfitter will come with more.

Good idea to go soon so you can return to experience a different island because Capt. Hill is sharing another private island soon—this one named May Hall and brimming with Darien’s timber history.

Most likely those details are a 2015 Surprising Suburb story. Anticipate totally different architecture, inside and out, buildings and landscape.

Insider tip for planning: don’t allow yourself to relax so much on Eagle Island that you turn down the option to go with Capt. Andy to Sapelo Island. The boat ride’s pleasant, the history of this tiny, enduring community of Gullah Geechee people is important and remarkable, the tour of the Reynolds Mansion interesting … and the solitude on Nannygoat Beach is divine.

Might be the finest beach either of us will ever experience.

PHOTOS by Christine Tibbetts

Christine 12. 2007 4Christine Tibbetts claimed Georgia as her home state in 1972.  She covers Georgia destinations, and the world, always offering prompts for exceptional experiences and opportunities to muse. Tibbetts earned a Bachelor of Journalism from the prestigious School of Journalism at the University of Missouri and is the recipient of numerous gold, silver and merit awards from North American Travel Journalists Association writing competitions. Follow her at www.TibbettsTravel.com.

Surprising Suburbs: Villa Rica

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Peal your eyes west next time you squint in the glare of Georgia’s capitol building. The gold leaf crowning that handsome dome has a new history.

Follow your view 35 miles to explore the Pine Mountain Gold Museum in Villa Rica and learn the facts about discovering gold in 1826, three years prior to the gold rush in Dahlonega.

IMG_2757Museum historians aren’t claiming the State Capitol gleam came from West Georgia, but they do raise interesting facts in an 18-minute documentary and in detailed exhibits about the early discoveries.

Then they teach techniques for finding bits of gold yourself. Worked for me, and the people on either side in a convenient stand-up trough with skimming pans and a teacher.

Larry “Pop” Arnold is his name. “Been panning for gold here for 50 years,” he says. “Keeps me outside and I just like the process.” 

He’s also a bona fide member of the Gold Prospectors Association of America. Who knew?

Maybe if my Spanish were up-to-snuff I wouldn’t have been surprised. After all, Villa Rica means village of gold. Another clue might be the Civil War company from Carroll County formally known as Georgia Company I, 19th infantry regiment, but called the Gold Diggers.

IMG_2756Fine grains, baby powder texture are the kind of gold found here and a ride on the railroad provides a sense of the land in which hopeful miners worked.

Carl Lewis is one of them, adding his authentic voice to museum tours, noting he is Villa Rica’s last commercial gold miner.

He also shares the story of the Samuel and Asa Candler families and their Coca-Cola bottling business in Villa Rica from 1903-1923.

Real-deal gold-mining history fills the woods, along with high and low huckleberry bushes, sassafras trees and wildflowers including hundreds of Pink Ladies.

Peer 50 feet into the Old Glory Hole to start understanding the process introduced in 1917 to extract the gold. Cyanide, sump tanks, ore gondolas, leaching tanks, after-effects of plate tectonics – this is a vocabulary lesson too.

Signage is clear and informative.  

IMG_2760$5.00 is the price of Museum admission, $5.00 more to ride the train (a pleasant experience relying on a four cylinder propane engine and air brakes), $5.00 to pan for gold and gemstones. Not so simple to master the right flick of the wrist so I appreciated miners more just because I tried.

Walking three miles of nature trails is free, so are the picnic grounds. Stockmar Park is the location and I’d recommend allowing time to see the farm animals and community garden.

In fact, all day could be plenty of family fun. Get a picnic to go from Evans Barbecue Company or The Southern Table.

Christine 12. 2007 4Christine Tibbetts claimed Georgia as her home state in 1972.  She covers Georgia destinations, and the world, always offering prompts for exceptional experiences and opportunities to muse. Tibbetts earned a Bachelor of Journalism from the prestigious School of Journalism at the University of Missouri and is the recipient of numerous gold, silver and merit awards from North American Travel Journalists Association writing competitions. Follow her at www.TibbettsTravel.com.

Surprising Suburbs: Watkinsville

All-inclusive resort vacations aren’t limited to the Caribbean; try this concept — a surprising suburb of Athens.

Point is—vacationing with indulgences is within reach! If this checklist works for you, head to Watkinsville.

  • Luxurious accommodations
  • Abundant art
  • Massage and yoga
  • Gardens and gentle walking paths
  • A bit of history
  • Convenient dining
Ashford Manor

Ashford Manor

Sleep in Ashford Manor, an 1893 Queen Anne home that is a sumptuous inn where breakfast is a work of art.

I might make arrangements in advance to see about dinner there too, or a picnic packed to enjoy on the terraced yard.

“We’re very high service oriented,” says Dave Shearon. “Breakfast can be in your room, on the porches or in the gardens.”

Wherever you like and whatever you like seems to be their style at the Ashford Manor.

 

Choose the 1840s cottage with three suites if you are an antebellum purist or the elegant main house. Expect almost 10 acres, four terraces, gracious yards and a gazebo.

Cottage at Ashford Manor.

Cottage at Ashford Manor.

What else is all-inclusive? You could arrange a massage therapist for in-room treatments.

Walk across the street—busy but with a traffic light—and choose from several eateries.

There is a yoga studio across the street too and that’s an all-inclusive feature many claim in the resort world. Could splurge on a four-day yoga renewal retreat in March, at Ashford Manor.

Artland is Watkinsville’s moniker, and one way to immerse yourself is in the 1827 Haygood House, now home and gallery for Jerry and Kathy Chappelle.

Watkinsville Chappelle Gallery

Chappelle Gallery

As if their fine pottery weren’t reason enough, 125 artists have works here. Happy Valley Pottery, the community of artists a few miles south of Watkinsville, is all wrapped up in the art movement here since the 1970s. Ask for pointers to the Watkinsville mural art that is located in several locations around town. The last population census was 2,832 so you know you won’t have to drive far.

The pewter is polished and the wood handsome in Watkinsville’s Eagle Tavern. Could have purchased a half-pint of cordial there had I visited in 1819, according to ledgers with flowing handwriting. Instead I mused about the wonder of standing in a 1790s former stagecoach, then hotel, then tavern on land given to a Revolutionary War veteran. That classic George Washington portrait hanging in thousands of classrooms meant more in this place.

Oconee is the county name, and Athens is just 10 minutes north.

Christine 12. 2007 4Christine Tibbetts claimed Georgia as her home state in 1972.  She covers Georgia destinations, and the world, always offering prompts for exceptional experiences and opportunities to muse. Tibbetts earned a Bachelor of Journalism from the prestigious School of Journalism at the University of Missouri and is the recipient of numerous gold, silver and merit awards from North American Travel Journalists Association writing competitions. Follow her at www.TibbettsTravel.com.

Surprising Suburbs: LaGrange, Georgia

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Hills and Dales Estate in LaGrange, Georgia.

Choose lunch on a jaunt to LaGrange, a surprising suburb of Columbus. The great-great grandson of the legendary town philanthropist most likely is cooking at the stylish downtown eatery called C’sons, pronounced “seasons,” and the exquisite menu is seasonal, changing daily with what’s fresh.

Here’s why I found that significant: LaGrange has much more going on than most towns of 30,000 — art and history museums, fine culinary experiences, handsome downtown facades and urban forest treescapes. It’s a natural setting for storytelling and art festivals, symphony, ballet and theater, with audiences to fill them. It’s also home to gardens and historic homes, plus significant artifacts in an antiquity center.

Fuller E. and Ida Cason Callaway set the tone in the community as early as 1895, and their notion of sharing abounds to this day. Their two sons carried on the home and businesses, each forming a foundation touching LaGrange in major ways today.

Statue of the Marquis de Lafayette in downtown LaGrange.

Statue of the Marquis de Lafayette in downtown LaGrange.

I recommend spending the day in their home and gardens, Hills and Dales Estate. The home is protected, preserved and filled with original family furnishings. That means something since the Italian villa has 30 rooms. Enormous but not pretentious. Docents guide the tours, but no velvet ropes stop visitors from walking throughout the rooms. How special is that? Trusted in a historic home.

Allow plenty of time to stroll the boxwoods, trees and flowers, continuously cultivated for 180 years. With 23 garden highlights noted on the tour brochure, you might want time to breathe the fragrances and to muse. I recommend sitting on the curved stone bench where Ida and Fuller fell in love. Hear their story in the “Living Legacy” documentary in the visitor center.

The allure of storytelling at Hills and Dales and throughout LaGrange feeds an 18-year-old annual storytelling festival. “Listening to stories brings back our own memories and reflections,” says Joyce Morgan Young, one of the Azalea Storytelling Festival founders.

Legacy on Main Museum in LaGrange, Georgia.

Legacy on Main Museum in LaGrange, Georgia.

Quilts in Legacy on Main stitched me back to the textile industry. Wealthy women were the quilters, the exhibit suggests, in an era when fabric only came your way with spinning and weaving. When textile mills like the Callaway’s created cloth, quilting became more available to other women, too.

These LaGrange fabrics continue to influence the arts, so I learned from Karen Anne Briggs, executive director of the LaGrange Art Museum. “Textiles require design,” she said, “and the mills sent people to Europe to study fine design.

“This community has a disproportionately large population of people interested in art, in design, in creative expression,” Briggs said.

Visit Bellevue, too, an 1850 Greek revival home with a story of its own about the Nancy Harts.

This all-female militia formed in LaGrange, credited with preventing Federal soldiers from destroying grand homes when they marched through on April 16, 1865. Forty women drilling twice weekly with Capt. Nancy Morgan halted the forces of Col. Oscar H. LaGrange. (How ironic that was his name?) Businesses burned, homes were saved and the militia women served dinner.

Perhaps all these connections also fuel the reason Israel chooses to share ancient artifacts for display in the LaGrange Explorations in Antiquities Center. This interactive history museum describes itself as daily life in Biblical times: shepherds, farmers, villages, Roman market streets and dining experiences. The new Biblical Life artifacts gallery, officials say, is one of only seven worldwide and only four in America with a long-term collection from Israel.

Christine 12. 2007 4Christine Tibbetts claimed Georgia as her home state in 1972.  She covers Georgia destinations, and the world, always offering prompts for exceptional experiences and opportunities to muse. Tibbetts earned a Bachelor of Journalism from the prestigious School of Journalism at the University of Missouri and is the recipient of numerous gold, silver and merit awards from North American Travel Journalists Association writing competitions. Follow her at www.TibbettsTravel.com.