Fan Photo Friday

Submit your Georgia photos for the chance to be featured:

Nickajack Creek in Smyrna. Photo by Wildflower Photography. Submitted via Facebook.

Nickajack Creek in Smyrna. Photo by Wildflower Photography. Submitted via Facebook.

Rome, Georgia. Photo by jabrock1. Submitted via Flickr.

Rome, Georgia. Photo by jabrock1. Submitted via Flickr.

Atlanta, Georgia. Photo by @tambamdob. Submitted via Instagram.

Atlanta, Georgia. Photo by @tambamdob. Submitted via Instagram.

 

 

 

Civil War Wednesday: Battle of Chickamauga

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A future company of the 5th GA on parade ground.

During the fighting along Chickamauga Creek in September 1863, the soldiers of the 5th Georgia Infantry Regiment epitomized the stream’s English translation “The River of Death.” These Georgians, part of Brigadier General John K. Jackson’s brigade, in Major General Frank Cheatham’s division, saw action twice on September 19 and finished the battle the following day with a brave charge under heavy fire. Fighting under the command of Colonel Charles P. Daniel, the 5th opened their involvement on September 19 with an advance toward the Federal brigade of Colonel John Croxton positioned above Winfrey Field.

Brigadier General John K. Jackson.

Brigadier General John K. Jackson.

Jackson’s brigade moved astride the Alexander’s Bridge Road aligned left to right as follows: 5th GA, 2/1 CSA, 5th MS, 8th MS, and 2nd GA Sharpshooters. Overcoming initial confusion about the exact location of the Federal position, the Confederates rallied and fought until virtually extinguishing all of their ammunition. A runner sent to carry additional rounds to the front received a mortal wound. When Southern reinforcements arrived, Croxton’s new line rested roughly three-quarters of a mile rearward from his original position, and the Georgians had captured three Federal artillery pieces. The day had not yet ended for the men of the 5th as they received orders to advance a second time. With darkness settling over the fields of Chickamauga, the blood of additional members of the regiment would stain the north Georgia soil. The rapid firing of minié balls, combined with artillery shell and canister, ignited a fire in the thick brush. Private W.K. Pilsbury of the 5th later recalled, “…the cries of the wounded were dreadful to hear…as the battle waged to and fro that fateful autumn night…an impression upon the minds and hearts of all those who were engaged…will last as long as life.”[1]

Sadly, life would not prove long for many of the soldiers in the 5th Georgia, as day two of the battle produced even heavier casualties. Daniel made note in his post-battle report of the “…heavy enfilading fire of shot, shell, and grape,” which greeted his regiment as they advanced in support of Major General Pat Cleburne’s attack.[2] The Georgians continued to press, the men fighting and dying until finally repulsing the remaining Federals from the field.

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5th GA soldiers in camp

Jackson recapped his casualties in the after-action report and lamented that his “…greatest loss was in the Fifth Georgia Regiment.”[3] Among the 317 soldiers of the 5th Georgia present for duty at Chickamauga, 194 lay dead, wounded or numbered among the missing at the conclusion of the battle. In amassing a casualty percentage of 61.1, the 5th Georgia ranks 15th among all Confederate regimental losses during the entire war.[4] As one battle observer commented, “Gen. Frank Cheatham’s command was the greatest evidence of the terrific effect of artillery fire.”[5] Chickamauga proved a field of death for the men of the 5th Georgia Infantry.


[1] W.K. Pilsbury, “The Fifth Georgia at Chickamauga,” Confederate Veteran, January, 1895, 330, http://ia700405.us.archive.org/3/items/confederateveter03conf/confederateveter03conf.pdf (accessed August 14, 2103).

[2] United States War Department, The War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Series 1, Vol. 30, pt. 2 (Harrisburg, PA: National Historical Society, 1971), 89.

[3] Ibid., 85.

[4] William F. Fox, Regimental Losses in the American Civil War 1861-1865 (1889; repr., Gulf Breeze, FL: eBooksonDisk, 2002), 556.

[5] Christopher Losson, Tennessee’s Forgotten Warriors: Frank Cheatham and His Confederate Division (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1989), 107.

Images from: The Photographic History of the Civil War.

mikeMichael K. Shaffer is the Assistant Director and Lecturer for Kennesaw State University’s Civil War Center , a Civil War historian, newspaper columnist, and author of ‘Washington County, Virginia in the Civil War.’ He is a member of the Society of Civil War Historians, Historians of the Civil War Western Theater, Georgia Association of Historians, and the Civil War Round Table of Atlanta. Michael also serves on the boards of the Civil War Round Table of Cobb County and the River Line Historic Area, and as a Civil War consultant for the Friends of Camp McDonald.

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Outdoor Adventures in Columbus

This piece was written by 11-year old Jake Myler to provide a child’s perspective on Columbus, Georgia.

cMy adventure to Columbus, Georgia was a blast filled with bicycling, kayaking and tons of outdoor adventures.

Columbus is known for its history and there are many interesting museums. The city is also now becoming known for some great outdoor adventures.  My two favorite things on the trip were bike riding and white water rafting. Before I get to that, let me tell you about the bed and breakfast we stayed at.

We loved the Rothschild-Pound House Inn in a historic area of town where many nice homes are located. The Rothschild-Pound House Inn has rooms in the main house, as well as cottages available. The gourmet breakfasts served each morning were great. One morning, we ate blueberry pancakes and I really liked them. Another day, we had biscuits, bacon, grits, and fresh fruits.

Our first adventure was on a bicycle tour that provided a great way to see views along the river. Our guide told us lots of interesting information, including that there is a pair of nesting Eagles along the opposite side of the river! We rode by the waterfront to the National Civil War Naval Museum.  In the museum, we saw two famous boats that sunk and have been brought up to the surface. It was really interesting to see this history up close.

Another day we had the big adventure for our trip. We went white water rafting and I had the time of my life! You go through eight rapids. Towards the end, they have an island where you can go and watch the rafters. My aunt was there watching as we passed by. Before you get to the end, you can jump out and swim to the end of the course. Our guide’s name was Judson and he did a great job. The 2.5 mile waterway is located in the downtown area and it makes for an interesting trip.

We had some great food on the trip. One of my favorite restaurants we ate at is called Country’s. They have a wide selection of foods and desserts! The meringue on the pie was at least a foot tall.

One of the things I like about Columbus is that you can walk to so many places. We walked around a lot in the downtown area. By the end of my trip, we had walked 12 and a half miles! That’s a lot for just two days!

I had the time of my life in Columbus. If you ever get a chance go to Columbus, you should take it.

Jake MylerJake Myler, 11, often accompanies his aunt, MainStreet Newspapers Inc. editor Angela Gary, on trips and writes about his experiences, giving readers a youth perspective.

Georgia Grown: Macon Beer Company

965778_412658482187944_1766396934_oFriendships born in college don’t always last and they rarely result in productive things. Though they undoubtedly had many unproductive experiences while in one another’s company, Jeremy Knowles and Cory Smith were able to beat the odds.  Jeremy and Cory are the founders and owners of Macon Beer Company, middle Georgia’s only brewery. Jeremy is a professional chemical engineer, giving impetus to the company tagline, ‘Engineering Great Beer,’  and picked up the home brewing hobby a few years after college.  Cory completed graduate school, then became Jeremy’s most reliable consumer.  Together, they visited most Georgia breweries and gained insight that eventually led them to develop their own craft brewery.

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Jeremy & Cory

They are ready to start brewing their own recipes and sharing their beer with the masses.  Macon Beer Company will initially offer two brands, ‘Macon History,’ a sweet brown ale, and ‘Macon Progress,’ a perfectly-balanced pale ale.  These will start appearing this fall and will be followed by other, more adventurous recipes.  They will also produce seasonal brands coinciding with local events.  A cherry wheat ale premiere during the Cherry Blossom Festival.  Macon Octoberfest will feature a new recipe each year with proceeds from sales of the brew going to the event’s preferred charities.

The brewery has a tap room that is currently being renovated in the historic, downtown Macon building at 345 Oglethorpe Street. Tours and tasting events will be scheduled, wherein participants can sample Macon Beer Company products, tour the facility, enjoy live music in the outdoor beer garden, and catch an interactive brewing demonstration.

480577_325079677612492_318603085_nJeremy and Cory aim to have Macon Beer Company products in other parts of the state after they get comfortable with demand in the middle Georgia area.  Keep an eye on their website and social media platforms for information about when their brews are headed to your town.  In the meantime, hit the interstate and drive toward the Heart of Georgia to experience one of the state’s newest microbreweries.

Fan Photo Friday

Submit your Georgia photos for the chance to be featured:

Chief Vann House in Chatsworth. Photo by Lisa Westberry. submitted via Facebook.

Chief Vann House in Chatsworth. Photo by Lisa Westberry. submitted via Facebook.

Little Mulberry Park in Dacula. Photo by rszphoto. Submitted via Flickr.

Little Mulberry Park in Dacula. Photo by rszphoto. Submitted via Flickr.

Athens. Photo by @clintonbrannen. Submitted via Instagram.

Athens. Photo by @clintonbrannen. Submitted via Instagram.