Georgia Grown: Kendrick Anderson | Furniture Maker

1Name: Kendrick Anderson | Furniture Maker

Where: Atlanta, GA

Story: Kendrick Anderson, an Atlanta-based furniture maker, was studying English literature in college when he became transfixed with an idea: he wanted to build a table. He had no experience in woodworking, but Kendrick knew he would be able to build furniture; after all, his family history had proven itself.

“My father builds custom homes, and my grandfather owned a sawmill/lumber yard for most of his life,” he explains. “So I guess you could say working with wood is in my blood.” After searching the city for free work in exchange for an apprenticeship, the single-minded student finally landed at a modest custom furniture shop. Following years of apprenticing and studying, Kendrick opened his own eponymous furniture-building shop.

2Kendrick draws his inspiration from mid-century modern proportions, the rejection of ornamentation by the Shakers, and the joinery (how two pieces of wood are held together) of the arts and crafts movement – all together revealing a minimalistic essence that envelopes every piece he creates. “I love the interplay between simple, clean forms coupled with exposed joinery,” he says. “I want my furniture to convey a quiet stillness when viewed from across the room, and yet possess increasing depth when inspected up close.”

Each Kendrick  Anderson piece is custom-made, and while clients generally have a broad idea of what they want, Kendrick embeds his aesthetic into their needs, creating a one-of-a-kind piece that will serve generations. “I am humbled by each piece and every client who grants me the opportunity to create something they will use for the rest of their lives.”

Content courtesy of Bearings.

All photos by Andrew Thomas Lee.

Fan Photo Friday

Submit your Georgia photos for the chance to be featured:

Dahlonega, Georgia. Photo submitted by Sussman Imaging via Facebook.

Dahlonega, Georgia. Photo submitted by Sussman Imaging via Facebook.

Skidaway Island. Photo by @dusta. Submitted via Instagram.

Skidaway Island. Photo by @dusta. Submitted via Instagram.

Canton, Georgia by larri073. Submitted via Flickr.

Canton, Georgia by larri073. Submitted via Flickr.

 

Civil War Wednesday: The 11th Georgia Infantry at Gettysburg

Brigadier General George “Tige” Anderson; Courtesy Digital Library of Georgia

July 2, 1863, day two of the fighting at Gettysburg, found the corps of Lieutenant General James Longstreet launching an attack against the left of the Federal position. The resultant hard fighting produced many casualties among the roughly 94,000 Federal troops of Major General George Meade, and the Army of Northern Virginia, under the command of General Robert E. Lee – a force of almost 72,000 soldiers. The various battles of the day introduced new place names into the American lexicon – Devil’s Den, Little Round Top, The Peach Orchard, and The Wheatfield. The action in the Wheatfield involved several of more than 40 Georgia units engaged at Gettysburg; however, none would suffer as greatly as the 11th Georgia Infantry Regiment, part of Brigadier General George “Tige” Anderson’s brigade in Major General John Bell Hood’s Division, Longstreet’s Corps.

Major Henry McDaniel; Courtesy Vanishing Georgia Collection, Georgia Archives

As the late afternoon of brutal fighting unfolded, the brave men of the 11th Georgia, along with other Georgians, South Carolinians, Texans, and Arkansans struggled to drive the Federal troops from the Wheatfield. Anderson’s brigade became the first Southern element to reach the Wheatfield. Once there, they confronted Colonel Regis de Trobriand’s brigade, specifically the soldiers of the 17th Maine positioned on their left. A stonewall dividing the Wheatfield from the surrounding countryside marked a coveted position on the field, and the Georgians twice crossed the barrier only to face a withering fire, which forced them to withdraw. Sometime after 5:30 p.m., Anderson fell wounded, and command of the brigade transferred to the 11th Georgia’s Colonel Francis Little. Lieutenant Colonel William Luffman took charge of the 11th until he too received a wound, leaving the Georgians to continue the fight under yet another new officer – twenty-six-year-old Major Henry McDaniel. McDaniel would survive the carnage of Gettysburg and the balance of the war’s engagements to become Georgia’s governor in 1883. Many of McDaniel’s men did not escape the arena of death in the Wheatfield. A Georgia officer participating in the attack noted, “We rallied the men and charged the third time almost into the mouths of their cannons…I could hear bones crash like glass in a hailstorm.”[1] Three hundred nine soldiers of the 11th entered the battle of July 2; at the day’s end, the number of dead, wounded, or missing totaled 201, for a 65 percent casualty rate – among the highest in Lee’s entire army during the three days of fighting at Gettysburg.[2]


[1] J. Keith Jones, Georgia Remembers Gettysburg: A Collection of First-Hand Accounts Written by Georgia Soldiers (Gettysburg, PA: Ten Roads Publishing, 2013), 21.

[2] J. David Petruzzi and Steven Stanley, The Gettysburg Campaign in Numbers and Losses: Synopses, Orders of Battle, Strengths, Casualties, and Maps, June 9-July 14, 1863 (El Dorado Hills, CA: Savas Beatie, 2012), 124.

mikeMichael K. Shaffer is the Assistant Director and Lecturer for Kennesaw State University’s Civil War Center. He is a Civil War historian, author, and newspaper columnist, and a member of the Society of Civil War Historians. He serves on the boards of the Civil War Round Table of Cobb County and the River Line Historic Area, and assists the Friends of Camp McDonald as a Civil War consultant.

The Civil War Center

July 4th in the Peach State

Centennial Olympic Park

Centennial Olympic Park

Independence Day activities around Georgia

Are you looking for a fun activity to celebrate the Fourth of July? Whether you are spending the holiday weekend in Metro Atlanta, on the Coast or elsewhere in Georgia, our communities have a smorgasbord of events planned for you and your family, neighbors and friends to celebrate Independence Day. From firework shows to ice cream socials to boat parades, the state of Georgia has plenty to offer this Fourth of July weekend.

If you are looking for a pre-Fourth activity, the city of Hartwell is hosting a Pre-Fourth Extravaganza Weekend June 28-29. The extravaganza includes Dancin’ on Depot, a craft festival and fireworks.

Are you feeling the need for speed this Fourth of July? 60,000 runners will line up on the starting line of the annual AJC Peachtree Road Race on July 4. Join the fans on the sidelines to cheer on the runners as they race down Peachtree Road to Piedmont Park. A 5/10K run will also be held at Nash Farms in Hampton, Ga. at its July 4th Fireworks at Nash Farms event and in Martinez, Ga. at the 2013 Yankee Doodle Dash. July 4th Fireworks at Nash Farm will also include a car and motorcycle show and fireworks. If you want to spend your holiday in the fast lane, the Atlanta Motor Speedway has a special Thursday Thunder  planned for July 4. Bring the kids for a full day of face painting, rock climbing, autograph sessions and fireworks at the race track.

Is there a better way to spend Independence Day than watching America’s favorite pastime? Cheer on the Atlanta Braves as they face the Miami Marlins, and enjoy the post-game firework show.

Do you want to spend your Fourth of July at an iconic Atlanta hotspot? Beat the heat, and join the Georgia Aquarium for its Red White & Brew celebration where you can watch the 4th of July at Centennial Park firework show from the Aquarium’s balcony. If a legendary fireworks show is what you seek this holiday weekend, the Legendary 4th of July fireworks show in Lennox Square is a must, or head to Stone Mountain Park for its Fantastic Fourth Celebration.

Are you looking to spend your day on the water? Join the boat parade on Lake Chatuge in Hiawassee, or head to the beach for the Jekyll Island July 4 Celebration. Callaway Gardens is hosting a July 4th Star Spangled Beach Party with live music and fireworks. For fireworks on the water, go to Fireworks on the Flint at Lake Blackshear in Cordele or to Savannah for the Fourth of July Festival on the River.

Are you looking to kick off your shoes and relax? Make a picnic to bring to the Annual Independence Concert & Picnic event at the Madison-Morgan Cultural Center in Madison or stop by Athens for the Classic City American Music Festival. Rome will host the Community 4th of July Celebration in Riverside Park where visitors can listen to music performed by the Rome Symphony Orchestra and the Eighth Regiment Band. You can also join the folks in the McDonough Square for a 4th of July Ice Cream Social. Douglas will host its Freedom Fest in JC Adams Municipal Park, and Thomasville will host the Thomasville Independence Day Celebration & Fireworks in Remington Park.

Whether you are looking for fireworks or a day at the lake, Georgia communities have a July 4 event planned for you. Put on your red, white and blue, and celebrate the USA with us this Independence Day.

Collins_Goss_HeadshotA Georgia native and UGA alumnae, Collins Goss is the summer communications intern for the Georgia Department of Economic Development. Currently, she is working on her Masters in Fine Arts in Arts Administration emphasizing in communications at The University of Alabama. Collins will graduate in December and hopes to return to the Peach State.

Fan Photo Friday

Submit your Georgia photos for the chance to be featured:

photo by @akatjohnson16. Submitted via Instagram.

photo by @akatjohnson16. Submitted via Instagram.

Cumberland Island. Photo by Darryl W. Moran Photography. Submitted via Flickr.

Cumberland Island. Photo by Darryl W. Moran Photography. Submitted via Flickr.

Bostick, Georgia. Photo by Rick Stepp. Submitted via Facebook.

Bostick, Georgia. Photo by Rick Stepp. Submitted via Facebook.